Gear

This is not your average how-to-sail manual. In The Blue Book of Sailing, Adam Cort (SAIL’s Senior Editor) divides sailing into “The 22 keys to sailing mastery.” The topics are basic but presented an in-depth manner that will provide even lifetime sailors with a deeper understanding. For instance, rather than simply describing the process of a tack, Cort delves into the evolution of tacking
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Push Button Grinding

by David Schmidt, Posted March 1, 2010
Like thousands of other sailors, I scoffed at powered winches until a rock-climbing injury reduced my right shoulder to an arthritic mess. So, while I love to spin handles, I’ve realized that powered winches are my friends. And I’m not alone. Most medium-to-large cruising boats I saw at last year’s United States Sailboat Show at Annapolis either came fitted with some (or all) powered winches, or
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Grinding Made Easy

by Adam Cort, Posted February 26, 2010
Grinding winches can be fun—to a point. Now, for those times when you don’t feel like building arm strength there’s the WinchRite, from Sailology LLC, a fully portable electric winch handle that makes everything from raising the main to furling in the genoa a snap.

Designed specifically for sailing, the WinchRite provides up to 100 newton meters of torque and rotation speeds from 50 to 120


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Crucial Equipment

by David Schmidt, Posted February 11, 2010
Chandleries are rife with good folding sailing knives. Selecting the right one often comes down to utility and taste. While the latter quality is subjective, utility is easy to quantify. I’ve been using the Gerber Crucial Tool for several months and I’ve been impressed with its clever design, fantastic utility, and small size and minimal weight (just 5 ounces). While a sharp, locking blade is
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Sailors today live in an era replete with new equipment and innovation. Looking back on the state-of-the-art in February of 1970—when SAIL’s first issue was unveiled—you’d find aluminum was still considered a pretty high-tech material. Wooden spars were still relatively common. Electronics were primitive: LORAN was top dog, and plenty of cruisers used radio direction finders when navigating out
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