Gear

Wind Powered

by Sail Staff, Posted March 10, 2007
Estesian Technologies’s new wireless anemometer achieves self-sufficiency via an internal brushless generator that requires only a small amount of wind for power. The device is compatible with standard potentiometer-based wind-direction sensors, allowing it to provide wind-direction measurements. It is accurate to +/-0.17 knot, has a range of 300 feet, and has both pulse and analog outputs; a
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Sticky Weekends

by Sail Staff, Posted March 10, 2007
Choosing sailing footwear is game of compromises: don deck shoes and your dogs will howl in the heat; wear open-toed sandals and you risk a trip to the podiatrist if you “discover” any deck hardware. To this end, Timberland recently launched its new line of Mion sailing footwear. Featuring an ergomorphic footbed that molds to your foot, a sculpted superstructure that holds your foot firmly in
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Fill 'er Up

by Sail Staff, Posted March 10, 2007
Sailors rely on batteries to power any number of gizmos, but in the case of disposable batteries, this reliance comes at a hefty cost to the consumer and to the environment. More Power 2U claims its new Battery Xtender safely and effectively recharges disposable alkaline, nickel metal hydride, nickel cadmium, zinc carbon, titanium, and rechargeable alkaline manganese batteries without
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2007 FKP Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted March 6, 2007
Edited by David Schmidt

By definition, sailors are gearheads. Whether it’s a new sail, new electronics, or even a new mainsheet, they’re eager to put their new gear through the paces. Few people recognized this love of gear and need for innovation more than the late Freeman K. Pittman, SAIL’s technical editor from 1982 to 1996. Freeman was widely regarded by members of the marine


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Mr. Oxford Boat Yard

by Sail Staff, Posted February 28, 2007
I hesitated before throwing a heavy line into the thin outstretched arms of the older fellow standing at the head of our slip. But he caught the line, wrapped it deftly around a cleat, and beckoned for the next one. This was our first visit to the quiet Chesapeake Bay town of Oxford, Maryland, and we had just met James Robert “Just call me Jimmy” Taylor, Oxford Boat Yard’s 95-year-old dockmaster
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