Cruising

All That Jazz

by Sail Staff, Posted November 8, 2010
Just about the time most people are preparing their boats for winter storage—stowing sails, putting on tarps, filling their systems with antifreeze—my wife, Ann Marie, and I are getting ready to go see the Cape May Jazz Festival, one of the best-kept sailing secrets on the Jersey Shore. What could be better than cruising 40 miles from our homeport of Atlantic City for a weekend of jazz, good
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Cruising

Sailor's Smorgasbord

by Wally Moran, Posted November 8, 2010
Southwest Florida is one of my favorite cruising areas, especially in early November when the Chesapeake Bay is starting to get chilly and Lake Huron’s North Channel is just plain miserable. The winds have shaken off the summer doldrums, the temperature is in the mid to upper 70s, and anchorages and marinas are not yet crowded with winter visitors. In short, it’s the ideal time and place for a
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Caribbean

Skinny Sailing

by Peter Nielsen, Posted October 11, 2010
Thus begins a time of hunger, but the trade-off is compelling: 10 days of sacrifice for the serious fun of sailing in a legendary Caribbean event with a group of dialed-in high-school sailors and the boat’s skilled and gracious owner, Mike Williams.

The 37th annual St. Thomas Rolex International Regatta sees 66 boats racing in seven classes to compete for four Rolex timepieces. Walking into


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Caribbean

Barely There

by Peter Nielsen, Posted October 11, 2010
Racing a charter boat is very different from campaigning your Sonar or Etchells or, as in our helmsman Charlie Garrard’s case, your J/105. Some bareboats are pretty tired, and sails can have a short lifespan in boisterous Caribbean conditions. Some of the bigger, heavier boats are cumbersome and slow to tack and trying to sail them well can be a frustrating exercise. Local knowledge of winds and
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Cruising I could barely hear the robotic voice of the NOAA weather radio over the engine as I sat at the nav station, groggy from an overnight passage across the Gulf of Maine. It was just past dawn on a late September day, and I was taking Sonata, my Pearson 36 cutter, south for the winter. One of my crew was asleep in the saloon; the other was on watch in the cockpit.

“For


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