Boatworks

Deck makeover Page 3

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Painting the antiskid

There are many options for painting the antiskid sections of a deck. You can sprinkle sand or crushed walnut shells over wet paint and then apply a second coat of paint over the top. You can add a proprietary compound like Intergrip to the paint, or you can buy a purpose-made paint that incorporates an antiskid additive. Or you can try something else entirely.

We’d already tried Interdeck one-part paint on Ostara’s deck. It was nice and grippy underfoot, but I had found it hard to keep clean and hot underfoot (well, it was a rather loud blue). Nor did it do anything to conceal the scars of a lifetime’s racing or the badly patched holes from old deck hardware. This is why I was intrigued by the pitch for Kiwigrip, a water-based acrylic polymer compound that was allegedly not only clean and quick to apply, but would also go on thickly enough to disguise unsightly deck blemishes. It is nontoxic, and cleanup would be easy. Best of all, it would go on over existing deck paint with no more preparation than a good scrubbing. It sounded promising, so I ordered some.

End result

The before-and-after shots tell the story. The new-look deck drew admiring looks and comments from everyone who laid eyes on it; two seasons later, the Kiwigrip has proven to be nice and grippy underfoot and still looks great. Two thumbs up.

Resources

Epifanes North America, Interlux Yacht Finishes, Kirby Paints, Kiwigrip, Pettit Paint, West Marine

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