Cruising Most Commented

Cruising Power

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008
Motoring at an "optimum" RPM might not always produce the greatest benefitBy STEVEN J. HENKIND and MICHAEL RYAN

Most sailors understand that by paying attention to sail trim, they can make their boats go faster under sail. But many sailors don't realize that by paying attention to engine RPM, they can make their boats go farther under power. Because the engine is an


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Spinnaker Strategies

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008

Reaching under a spinnaker in a good breeze calls for good teamwork between the helmsman and spinnaker trimmer. When you are close-reaching under spinnaker, keep the following in mind: • Keep a balanced helm; excessive weather helm is a sign the boat may be about to round up. • Watch for changes in wind strength; to maintain a consistent boatspeed, always


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Bluewater Lessons

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008

In sailing there are always old lessons to be learned (or relearned) and conventional wisdom to be challenged. When I took my 57-footer offshore from Mystic, Connecticut, to Miami, Florida, I learned again that following a cold front is not always a great idea. While a forecast may be upbeat and indicate improving conditions, cold fronts—particularly those that occur when the seasons are


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Eliminating Winch Overrides

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008
Many boatowners, racers and cruisers alike, have upgraded their genoa cars so they can be adjusted while under load. These systems are great for achieving proper sail trim, but sometimes the genoa cars end up high enough above the deck that the sheet lead to the winch drum is on a downward slope. This creates an inherent tendency for the sheet to override itself on the winch.

To avoid


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Staying Clean and Green

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008
Start using cleaning products that don’t damage the environment or your pocketbookBy Bob Tigar

Some “marine” cleaning products are specifically designed for marine use, but most are repackaged household products that are sold at significantly higher prices. When we kept our Morgan Out Island 33, Diversion, on Lake Michigan, cleaning and maintaining the boat wasn’t


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