Cruising

Paradise Found

by Cheetah Haysom, Posted January 25, 2011
In an age of instant knowledge, it’s rare to hear of places that are still “undiscovered.” This past summer, however, I had the opportunity to explore a cruising ground that, at least to the Western world, is still undiscovered: Montenegro’s Gulf of Kotor.

For years, Montenegro was considered out of bounds for Western sailors. With a population of 650,000—roughly the size of Baltimore—the


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It's Not All Cocktails in the Cockpit

by Nan Scrimgeour Weston, Posted January 24, 2011
Ten days gone, five things wrong…forget it!” How often have these words been uttered by a captain in a state of complete frustration?

We’d said our goodbyes at Georgia’s Brunswick Landing Marina and cast our lines. All was bright until we headed across St. Andrew’s Sound. The sunny weather changed quickly, and we were surrounded by patchy fog for the half hour we had to point our bow into


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Dry Tortugas Adventure

by Jack Foard, Posted January 24, 2011
Drop your hook in crystal clear turquoise water, walk these white sandy beaches under the bright warm sun and blue sky, and you might just think you are somewhere deep in the Bahamas or Caribbean. It’s hard to believe the Dry Tortugas, my favorite sailing destination in Florida, is only 70 miles west of Key West.

It was 2000 on a warm September evening when my wife, Desir, my sister Jane,


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Say Again

by Rod Glover, Posted January 18, 2011
There are many different ways to embarrass yourself while sailing. Having fenders hanging over your topsides or large scallops in your mainsail between the slides are two popular examples. Another is to use improper radio procedures. This demonstrates your incompetence not only to those who can see you, but to everyone within 20 miles.

I am constantly frustrated by the poor procedures I


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For cruisers bound south from points north, the long slog down the Intracoastal Waterway often ends at Beaufort, North Carolina, on the Crystal Coast, at the southern end of the Outer Banks. For some weary sailors, this backwater (in the best sense of the word) provides a chance to recuperate, repair, regroup, refuel and re-provision before firing up the diesel once more and plugging on down
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How to Save a Flipped Dinghy

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