Cruising

Hardening Targets

by Jan Irons, Posted June 16, 2011
We were savoring a meal of fresh mahi-mahi with new friends and soaking up the quirky backpacker atmosphere of the Caribbean beach town we planned to explore the following morning. Winterlude, our Passport 37, was anchored less than 100 yards away, just out of view. After lingering over one last rum punch, we dinghied back out to our boat in time to catch the last rays of the setting sun
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Sailing Sense: The Islands of Trang

by Fran Slingerland, Posted June 16, 2011
Article originally appeared in February 2009 issue

The water at the entrance to Tham Morakot (Emerald Cave) is dark aquamarine. Dense schools of small fish make their way from alcove to alcove. In the air above, echoes clatter off the stalactites. The ocean reaches in like an arm and yanks out again. Under the water is silence; dark masses of fish drift in and out, and colors


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Originally published in February 2009 issue

Winter is biting deep now, and there isn’t a lot of sailing to be had in my local creek. It’s a grim scene in business too, so all I can say is thank goodness for the swinging oil lamp and the yarns that stand in for that stiff, cleansing beat to windward those of us in the north are missing so badly.

Last weekend I was a guest at


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Sailing Against the Tide

by Robbert Das, Posted June 15, 2011
In 1932 Eric de Bisschop, a 42-year-old French anthropologist, wanted to discover what effect ocean currents might have had on the migration of populations from eastern Asia to the Pacific islands. He was in China at the time, where he met a businessman named Joseph Tatibouet. Tati, as Bisschop called him, began to assume an important role in Eric’s life. He not only helped finance Fou Po, a
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When Hurricane Omar passed between St. Martin and St. Croix in mid-October last year, we found ourselves right in the middle of it. I like to think we are a little different from many of the other cruisers who were in St. Croix’s Christiansted Harbor when the storm went through. My husband, Dave, and I have raised our three boys on our Creekmore-designed 34-foot cutter, Eurisko. We always sail
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How to Save a Flipped Dinghy

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