Sailboat Cruising

Whether you’re looking for insights into the best cruising grounds of the East Coast, West Coast, Caribbean or Great Lakes, or the latest in tips and techniques for doing everything aboard from set the anchor to fix your engine, recover a man-overboard victim or trim your sails, our editors and contributors have the answers.

Gary Jobson

Profiles

An Interview with Gary Jobson

Gary Jobson is an America’s Cup-winning sailor and one of the most vocal—and opinionated—supporters of the sport. His story is an inspiration to sailors young and old alike. How did you know you wanted to make a career in sailing? The defining moment was when I was 12. I got a little dinghy called a Read More

Opinion

Waterlines: A Cruising Family Reunion

I have often said the cruising community is a small family spread out over a large canvas, and as proof of this, I can point to an encounter I recently witnessed in the un-nautical micro-nation of Andorra, high in the Pyrenees Mountains. This was in the home of Edward Allcard, a once well-known British solo Read More

Attempting to sail the 114 degree course

Cruising Tips

Cruising Tips: Understanding Set and Drift Tactics

An understanding of the effects of set and drift is vital for coastal sailors; it can make the difference between an enjoyable passage or a struggle to reach your destination against a foul current. As an example, let’s plan a Gulf Stream crossing from Miami to Gun Cay, Bahamas. You know it is safest not Read More

water_bkgd_12_16

Opinion

Trapped Under a Dinghy

 The lifejacket was an afterthought. The visitor had motored his way up the river, and I’d waved him over toward a vacant club mooring nearby. Sitting in my cockpit sipping coffee in the morning sunlight, I’d watched him, solo, make two failed attempts to hook the pickup. There was no wind, a slack tide, but Read More

mccoyrum

Profiles

Profile: The King of Rum Row, “the real McCoy”

Remembering the man known as “the real McCoy” Next time you hoist a sundowner in your cockpit at the end of a fine day of sailing you should, perhaps, spare a thought for Bill McCoy, the wanna-be cruiser who helped keep our nation in quality drink during the dark days of Prohibition. Though few remember Read More

Advertisement
Flying the screecher on a broad reach: or is it a Code 0, or a jib top?

Opinion

Waterlines: What’s That Sail?

Am I the only one confused by all the different names for headsails these days? When I first started sailing, things were pretty simple. A non-overlapping headsail set on a boat’s headstay was called a jib. An overlapping headsail was called a genoa. You might differentiate between different sizes of jibs with simple numbers or Read More

Cruising pets

Lifestyle

Pets Onboard: It’s a Dog’s (or Cat’s) Life

After working in veterinary medicine for more than 30 years in New England, I was well versed on the veterinary conditions pets in our area are exposed to. But what happens when you take your pet on a boat abroad? Many diseases are region-specific, and our pets may not be immune to them. When my Read More

sk11-12fPromo

Cruising Tips

Sketchbook: Chain Grip

A pawl on the stemhead roller acts like a ratchet—it lets you pull chain in, but prevents it from running out while you have a rest. In waves, let a rising bow help pull in the chain. B. The “spring” that holds the pawl on the chain can be a shock cord that also acts Read More

The boat in its winter cocoon on a dark night

Lifestyle

Surviving Winter Aboard

Living aboard has its challenges, whether you do it full-time or part-time in the Caribbean or the North Pole—which, I imagine, is not too different from living aboard through a Boston winter. I’ve lived aboard through two New England winters. The first, the notorious winter of 2014-15, was a tremendous learning experience. The conditions were Read More

Illustration by Jan Adkins

Opinion

Voice of Experience: Helicopter Rescue

“My name is Petty Officer Jaime Vanacore. I am your rescue swimmer.” Her Dolphin helicopter hovering 70ft over the peaks of the waves, Jaime had zipped down from the helicopter to the ocean, first with 25 knots of wind whisking her around and then with 15ft waves smacking her. She had unclipped from the line Read More

Advertisement