Cruising

Cruising Grounds

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2006
20 MILES AROUND... San Francisco, California

San Francisco may be the “most European” American city, but San Francisco Bay and the views of whitecaps beyond the cable-car lines make this more than just a California placename. The ocean beyond the Golden Gate is challenging. Within the shelter of the bay is sailing adventure enough, with its typical brisk and chilly sea breeze and


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The Harbormaster of Gringo Bay

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2006

In Clearwater they said, “stop by to see Jennifer.”

In Isla Mujeres, someone commented, “see Jennifer in El Rio Dulce.” “Who is she?” “An artist, with a home on ‘The Rio.’”

In Belize City, on learning that we planned to spend several months on “The River,” another boater advised us to stop by “Gringo Bay,” a small inlet on the south side of El Golfete, the widest spot on the river,


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The Jungle Medic

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2006

Cruising isn't always about boisterous passages or cocktails on the aft deck at sunset. On the contrary, much of our time is spent exploring the countryside and getting to know the local people. This approach enriched the experience for my wife Susan and me beyond our expectations when we moved aboard Sea Trek and began cruising almost 14 years ago. Our passage this April from the


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Cruising Tips - July 2006

by Sail Staff, Posted July 28, 2006
This month: Raising and lowering your outboard, charting tips, and what to do after you run aground.

Navigation

Chart SmartWe arrived off Suva, the capital of Fiji, after a 10-day passage from New Zealand. While we knew the island of Viti Levu was about 5 miles off our bow, we couldn’t see it because of a heavy rainstorm. My husband, Bob, turned on the


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Cruising Tips - Techniques

by Sail Staff, Posted July 28, 2006
Letting go the sheet (June 2006)

Releasing a loaded-up sheet from a winch when a boat tacks can be just cause for nervousness. Sailors who have just moved up to big keelboats often underestimate the loads on a sheet. On a boat up to 40 feet or so, the safest way is to first ease off a few inches, keeping the flat of one hand pressed against the turns as they surge round the winch


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