Maintenance

Diesel in the Air

by Niels R. Jensen, Posted August 21, 2008
Spilled diesel fuel leaves an unpleasant odor that can nauseate some people, especially if they have to be down below in heavy weather. It’s tough to get rid of the odor once it takes hold. When the diesel in the fuel tank aboard Freelance, my Pearson 36 cutter, became contaminated, my fuel filters clogged and disabled the engine. I changed the primary and secondary filters and bled the
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Boatworks

Paper or Plastic?

by Sail Staff, Posted August 21, 2008

"You're not carrying any paper charts?" is a question I've heard at all the exotic landfalls and cruiser's hangouts I've visited during my circumnavigation. Many cruisers, it seems, aren't quite ready to fully trust their electronic chartplotters. While almost all cruisers, other than a few diehards, do have plotters on board, they also carry enough paper charts and tools for measuring and


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Boat Reviews

Something Bold, Something New

by Sail Staff, Posted August 21, 2008
Kaidoz 31Some of the most innovative boat designs and concepts come out of France, and here is a fine example. The Kaidoz 31 has the rig of a hotshot racer, a hull design that gets it planing at 16 knots or more, and an accommodation plan that’s unlike anything I’ve seen on a monohull sailboat.

The twin rudders, torpedo-shaped ballast bulb slung from a skinny keel, huge rig,


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Seamanship

Nets Work

by Don Casey, Posted August 21, 2008
Providing proper stowage for clothing often seems to be way down the priority list on a cruising boat; most cruisers give a higher priority to stowing food, spare parts, and tools. But what happens to your clothes if there is no closet, dresser, or even a single drawer for them to occupy? Often they wind up in a locker with a front-opening door and lie there, loose on the shelf. While you may
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Boatworks

Genoa Gybe

by Tom Cunliffe, Posted August 21, 2008
A sailor quickly learns the right way to gybe a mainsail: Trim the mainsheet carefully, and always keep the boom and sail under full control. But in all the moving around, the headsail, often a genoa, tends to be forgotten. Unless you have a crew of eager sailors in search of a permanent job, that's usually a good course of action. Do nothing with the headsail until the mainsail has been
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