Boatworks

Radar Revolution

by Tim Bartlett, Posted June 15, 2009
For the past 60 years or so the basic principles of marine radar have not changed. A radar transmits very short pulses of microwave energy and receives echoes reflected back from solid objects. The direction of an object is indicated by the direction from which the echo returns, and its range is determined by the time interval between when the pulse was transmitted and when
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Electronics+Navigations

Navigation Gear

by Sail Staff, Posted June 15, 2009
Despite challenging economic conditions, the range and quality of new electronic product introductions has exceeded expectations. That’s good news for sailors, because there are lots of exciting choices out there for those who want to outfit a new boat or upgrade existing equipment.

Lowrance have upped the ante in the battle for supremacy in multifunction navigation


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Flagships

Big, fast, and beautiful

by Charles Mason, Posted June 15, 2009
They are starting to appear at many of the big boat regattas sailed off Newport, Cowes, Cannes, and other ports around the world. Often you see two or more running side by side under a cloud of sail to the finish as their crews strain to snatch every bit of power from the passing gusts and lulls. They’re not purebred racing boats; they’re the latest generation of performance
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Sails

Clues for Clews

by Win Fowler, Posted June 14, 2009

Jim Ballantine of Charleston, S. Carolina, asks:

 

’ve installed new adjustable cars for my genoa aboard my 39-foot sloop. But now that I have them, I’m not sure what adjustments I should make to the cars when sailing in different wind conditions. I do know that whenever I reef down the headsail I should move the cars forward. But I’m not sure what other adjustments to make


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Boatworks

Faded Glory

by Don Casey, Posted June 14, 2009
David Watkins of Parrish, Florida, asks:

"I have a 15-year-old fiberglass boat that I bought new. It has spent most of its life either in Florida or the Caribbean and has suffered severe exposure to the sun. There is surface crazing or cracking on the deck, coach roof, and upper topsides. These are not stress cracks, but they are widespread. Do you have some thoughts on


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