Boatworks

Two speed propeller

by Nigel Calder, Posted May 18, 2009
Black clouds bearing cold rain showers are racing across the sky. The VHF radio is broadcasting gale warnings. This is not the day to be testing propellers, but nevertheless we are headed out of a marina near Aarhus, in Denmark, on a Bavaria 42 equipped with a Gori three-bladed folding propeller.

The three- and four-bladed Goris are unique in the propeller world. They look much like any


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Engines and Systems

Propellers 101

by Aussie Bray, Posted May 18, 2009
A propeller converts the rotary output of a boat’s engine into an accelerated stream of water. This acceleration creates thrust that pushes the boat through the water. To work efficiently, propellers must be properly matched to their engines and transmissions. Other important factors include the boat’s displacement and waterline length and the clearance between the propeller shaft and the bottom
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A dangerous beat to windward

by Sail Staff, Posted May 18, 2009
My partner, Hale, and I were tacking back and forth just beyond the eastern edge of the Gulf Stream aboard our Kelly Peterson 44, Cayuga, waiting for daylight so we could enter the Bahama Bank, when we heard a boat calling on the VHF, “Mayday, Mayday. We are taking on water and are in danger of sinking.” We waited and listened, hoping the U.S. Coast Guard might reply. But there was no
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Maintenance

Diesel in a bag

by Richard Probert, Posted May 18, 2009
Halfway between St. John, New Brunswick, and Digby, Nova Scotia, a passage of about 30 nautical miles, the diesel in my Cape Dory 270 stopped. With 40-foot tides creating sluice-like currents, entering most harbors on the Bay of Fundy requires careful timing to arrive at slack water or when the tide is flooding. If you arrive late, you have to wait for the tide to change while being tossed about
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Seamanship

Industrial strength safety

by Sail Staff, Posted May 18, 2009
Rope clutches, or stoppers, are wonderful items to have on board. Not only are they quick and easy to operate, they eliminate the need for extra winches. But each one must be labeled so the trimmer can see immediately what line that particular stopper controls.

When San Francisco sailors Russ Irwin and Fay Mark labeled the clutches on their brand new 52-footer New


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