Seamanship

Seamanship: Twin power

by Chip Lawson, Posted June 19, 2009
I was looking up at the masthead from the deck trying to see how the main halyard and the mainsail’s headboard were interacting and how the upper swivel for the jib furler was aligned. I took my 7x50 binoculars but I was still unable to get the close-up view I wanted. Then, in a eureka moment, I pulled out my digital camera, with its zoom capability, and put its lens to one of the binocular’s
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Maintenance Having a long length of line ready to use at short notice is always a good idea when cruising. You never know when you may have to run out a long mooring warp or set a kedge anchor. The trouble is that such a seldom-used line often ends up under piles of gear in the cockpit locker. This is a bad arrangement, because when you want a long line you often need it right now. You don’t want to waste
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Boatworks

Bilge Bypass

by Sail Staff, Posted June 19, 2009
Being able to convert your engine’s raw-water intake into an emergency bilge pump is an important safety feature. A discussion on the subject that appeared in SAIL (March 2009) suggested closing the raw-water seacock first, disconnecting the intake hose from the seacock, and attaching an extension hose long enough to reach the bilge. This may work, but in my experience, when
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Maintenance

Boathandling: How to wind winches

by Charles Mason, Posted June 19, 2009
If you have invited guests aboard for an afternoon sail or for a cruise and you know they have limited sailing experience but want to be involved on deck, here’s a way to get them working that lets you be sure things are in order. Cut out some circular plastic rings that will fit snugly around your winch bases. Then put a series of arrows on the upper ring face—you can either use decals or draw
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Everything Else

Harbinger Laser Bathymetric Maps

by Sail Staff, Posted June 19, 2009
Few charts are as interesting as Harbinger Laser’s 3D bathymetric maps, which cover the Great Lakes, as well as smaller inland lakes and nationwide coastal regions. But what sets these maps apart is the company’s signature Lighthouse Map Series, which feature a digital-picture viewer, in addition to Harbinger Laser’s high-quality wooden topographical maps, which are made from Michigan-grown wood.
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