Best Boats

Moody 45 DS

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
What happens when one of Britain’s oldest and most conservative brands meets one of Germany’s most unorthodox boatbuilders? The Moody 45, that’s what. Longtime Moody designer Bill Dixon must have had a ball with this boat, built at the Hanse factory in Germany. It’s designed with most of the accommodation at deck level, just leaving heads and sleeping cabins down below. The
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Inshore Racing

10 Sailing Events at the London 2012 Olympics

by Daniel Berke, Posted August 17, 2009
The International Olympic committee announced on 13 August, 2009 that there will be 10 sailing events at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. This is a decrease from the 11 sailing events at the 2008 Games in Beijing, making room for new events that were not held in Beijing.

The eliminated class is the Tornado catamaran, despite the request made by the International Sailing Federation to keep


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Inshore Racing

Star light, star bright

by Daniel Berke, Posted August 13, 2009
This past weekend, the Star Class World Championship ended in a riveting come-from-behind win for Americans George Szabo and Rick Peters of US Sailing Team AlphaGraphics. Despite a discouraging “throw-away” first race (54 of 86 boats), Szabo and Peters persevered and sailed to victory in the second race, earning themselves the gold and the title of Star Class World Champions.

“Back on the


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Ocean Racing

Mac Attack: A look at the 2009 Chicago-Mac Race

by Sail Staff, Posted August 6, 2009
With limited wind throughout the 101st Chicago to Mackinac race, many would consider it ordinary. Except perhaps the nine-member crew on Zoom, who made it extraordinary, by winning the Chicago Mackinac Trophy with a corrected time 55:09.53.

“It was very satisfying,” said skipper Mike Newman. “It was a strange feeling. All we did was sail the boat. There was no


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Safety

No-risk mast climbing

by Peter Nielsen, Posted August 5, 2009
Most halyard winches are not powerful enough to hoist a 200-pound sailor up a mast, so you need to find a way to let your primary winches take the strain if you need to hoist someone up the rig. Here’s what we do on our boat, where the main halyard runs via a rope clutch (not seen in the photo) to a small winch on the mast. First, we loop a spare length of half-inch line a few times around the
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