Profiles

Case closed

by Sail Staff, Posted April 2, 2009
On June 6, 2008, the Cynthia Woods, a Cape Fear 38 owned by Texas A&M University-Galveston, was racing to Veracruz, Mexico, when her keel fell off and she capsized. Tragically, Roger Stone, the team’s safety officer, drowned after helping two students to safety.In late December, the Coast Guard’s Marine Safety Unit (MSU) in Galveston, Texas, with guidance from the U.S. Coast

Speed machine

by Sail Staff, Posted April 2, 2009
Over the past two years an intense battle has been waged between Thomas Coville aboard his 120-foot G-class trimaran, Sodeb’O, and Francis Joyon aboard his equally massive tri, IDEC 2. While the two Frenchmen likely share laughs ashore, when they’re racing offshore they are at each other’s throats, with one skipper battling to best the other in setting unbelievably fast

Hats off to Mr. Wilson

by David Schmidt, Posted March 13, 2009
Rich Wilson, 58, of Marblehead, Massachusetts, became the second American to have completed the Vende Globe, an unassisted, non-stop, around the world race that’s fought out in wildly powerful IMOCA 60 monohulls — when he crossed the finishing line in ninth place aboard his trusty stead, Great American III on March 9, 2009. While Wilson finished weeks behind the overall winner, Michel

Chess master

by David Schmidt, Posted March 12, 2009
In Grand Prix circles, few jobs titles exert more pressure on their bearers than that of tactician. In 2007, Terry Hutchinson, then-tactician for Team New Zealand, felt just how heavy of a burden that title can be when his team lost a final America's Cup battle to Alinghi by a mere 1 second.Flash forward to 2008 and Mr. Hutchinson was back in force, first winning Key West Race Week about

A Girl Against the Odds

by Meredith Laitos, Posted January 29, 2009
The Mount Everest of Sailing. The most grueling race a sailor can enter. An outrageous challenge and an epic adventure. The Vendee Globe race is all of these. Saying it’s a tough race to win is hyperbole; it’s a tough race to merely compete in. Every year, world-class sailors in state-of-the-art boats are forced to abandon the race for a variety of reasons. In 1992, British sailor Nigel
Glenn Ashby, 31, didn't even need the ninth -- and final -- race to seal his title as the six-time A-Cat World Champion in Belmont, Australia. With six first-place finishes, the Australian secured his victory on Lake Macquarie before any other boats could threaten him. Ashby sailed against 85 boats and, save for an uncharacteristic third-place finish in Race 1, remained consistently at the top of
Every early winter, as boats sit nestled in the cradles and snow drums down on their tarps, attention turns to US Sailing's coveted Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year awards, an award that focuses both on peak performances in a given year, as well as career-achievement recognition. This year, 26-year-old Anne Tunnicliffe and 40-year-old Terry Hutchinson were named as 2008's winners on

Nick Scandone Dies

by Kimball Livingston, Posted January 2, 2009
There's a saying in aviation, a code of honor:Fly it all the way to the scene of the crash. Nick Scandone was no pilot, but surely no one ever lived out such a creed more fully.Nick died in the early hours Friday, an event entirely foreseen and unavoidable. He had ALS, which cripples and then kills. What Nick did with his ALS, however, was set an example of how to live.
British Olympian Ben Ainslie, just days after competing in AC class racing in Valencia, has been named ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the Year at the 2008 ISAF General Assembly in the Spanish capital of Madrid. Ainslie won his third gold medal at the Qingdao Olympiad (he also has a silver in the Laser) with an overwhelmingly confident win in the Finn dinghy. Ainslie, 31, is the first

Solos

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 12, 2008
Thirty years after the first Singlehanded Transpacific Race, there’s a grassroots, run-what-you-brung, let’s-celebrate-life spirit still thriving in West Coast shorthanded sailing. You won’t find any French celebrity sailors with million-euro budgets. Nobody’s out to beat the world; they’re out to beat their friends. But if you’re thinking pushover, you haven’t met those friends. Let’s pick just
  • facebook
  • twitter