Inshore Racing

Moth madness

by Sail Staff, Posted April 17, 2009
If you’re into dinghy sailing or high-performance sailing, you’ve likely heard of foiler Moths, the latest iteration in the constantly evolving International Moth Class. These latest Moths use an ingenious senor wand (click here to read about how the mechanics of a foiler Moth work) and a twistable tiller to lift the

Short tacks

by Sail Staff, Posted April 6, 2009
Not surprising that only 154 boats turned out for the 22nd edition of Key West Race Week, down from 261 boats in 2008. Still, the competition was high, especially amongst the Melges 24 (33 boats) and the Melges 32 (20 boats) fleets. While the grand-prix action was in IRC 1, it was IRC 2 that proved to be the most interesting handicap fleet to watch as it featured the U.S. racing premiere of the

Speed sailing records smashed on water and land

by Tom Nunlist, Posted April 3, 2009
On the 26th of March, two separate teams broke both the world water and land sailing speed records independently of each other.An Australian team sailing the Macquarie Innovation broke their own water speed record set last December at Sandy Point, Victoria, Australia and became the first vessel to complete the official 500m run with an average of over 50 knots. At Ivanpah Lake in
US Sailing recently announced the names of the 2009 US Sailing Team Alphagrapics (USSTAG). This selection was based on the results of the 2009 Rolex Miami OCR. “We’re excited about the new team because we’ve never had this many Olympic and Paralympics sailors return this early in the quad, which is a sign we’re delivering more support to the sailors,” said Olympic Sailing Chairman Dean Brenner
Off the bow I could see Oklahoma. I looked over the stern, and yonder was Texas. Around me whitecaps were building on a special lake that splits the difference between two be-all, end-all rivals, and the name of that body of water says it all. Texoma. Mythology meets mixology.Surely you know the scripture: “Don’t mess with Texas.”Surely you know the Oklahoma

New kids in town

by Meredith Laitos, Posted February 1, 2009
It’s official. Strictly Sail Chicago has adopted a new child and things are going well. The Midwest College Sailing Association held its Annual Midwinters Conference above the action at Navy Pier and the conjunction of the two events was more of a success than either party planned for. On Friday 150 college sailors from around the region poured into the Chicago area and schmoozed with
After years of wanting to join forces, the Midwest College Sailing Association (MCSA) is excited to hold its annual Midwinters Conference in conjunction with Strictly Sail Chicago. The collaboration came together with help from Harken representative Bill Goggins who acted as the liaison, working with Navy Pier and Sail America to make the weekend a reality. Members of the MCSA are especially
The start of a new year often brings about big changes: a new diet, a new destination, and a new attitude. But for US Sailing, 2009 means the start of a new edition of The Racing Rules of Sailing, the legislating guidebook that gets a facelift every four years. The new edition for 2009-2012 includes some major amendments that will have sailors rethinking their race strategy. Dave Perry,

Lies and rumors

by Charles Mason, Posted November 19, 2008
The unnamed enthusiasts who are circulating news that rating increases for composite standing rigging aboard boats sailing under IRC are going to be removed next year are engaging in wishful thinking. At least according to IRC manager Jenny Howells.“While it is true that the IRC Technical Committee is looking at the rating cost of composite standing rigging,” says Howells, “It is unlikely

Heavy Lifting

by David Schmidt, Posted October 22, 2008
We all want our boats to be more stable, but how can this be accomplished? The conventional solution is to hang more ballast off a deeper keel. Think more progressively, and you’re talking about water ballasting, which, while effective, also adds extra weight. Go sci-fi, and you’re canting your keel to windward—which is very effective, but is complicated, accident-prone, and still depends on
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