Inshore Racing

Nerone Wins Farr 40 Worlds

by Adam Cort, Posted April 27, 2010
Nerone Wins Farr 40 WorldsAfter getting off to a slow start, the Rolex Farr 40 Worlds finished strong, with Massimo Mezzaroma’s Nerone (Italy) only locking up an overall victory on the final race of the regatta.This marks the second time Mezaroma has won the Farr 40 Worlds. His first win came in 2003. Second place in this year’s regatta went to Guido

Strong Medicine

by Kimball Livingston, Posted April 15, 2010
hat if I told you there is a way to keep post-college sailors in the game instead of letting them drift away? Of mixing generations of sailors? Stirring club spirit? Building relationships between different sailors and regions? Making the game more fun for all sorts of people? Well, I’m telling you.I have to admit I’m not talking about low-hanging fruit. It might be a no-brainer to want it
It’s one of the great ironies of sailing. Going dead downwind, arguably the “easiest” angle of sail, is also the slowest. Thanks to the phenomenon of apparent wind, modern boats regularly sail faster than the true wind speed on a reach. But on a run, there’s no getting around the fact that the faster you go, the less pressure there is on your sails—until now.
“If we move the leads forward, we get a deeper foot and the sail takes on a bigger shape,” explained North U director Bill Gladstone as he shifted the virtual leads on a graphic of a sail, which was projected on a screen for a classroom of 80 racers. “But if we adjust the jib sheet, that
American skipper Rick Merriman and crew Phil Trinter took first place on the sixth and final day of Star Class at this year’s Bacardi Cup in Miami and in the process secured an overall regatta win as well.With strong, gusting winds hitting 24 knots, about a half-dozen boats were dismasted, including the day's early leader, Bermudan skipper Peter Bromby and crew Magnus
South Florida will once again be the site of some of the world’s most competitive racing when the 2010 Miami Grand Prix kicks into gear later this week.The regatta, which takes place March 4-7, will feature a strong field of Farr 40s and Melges 32s, as well as a single IRC class. As was the case at Key West
It's Monday, and some of us at SAIL had less than stellar performances over the weekend on the water. So in order to console each other, we've pulled this video out of the archives. While rubbing is racing, it's important to remember just how much worse it could always be.  
The sailors lucky enough to be present for the 2010 Key West Race Week witnessed a pretty quiet rum tent, with numbers down for the second year in a row in the IRC and PHRF fleets. When I mentioned how shocked I was to find there was no wait for the free Heinekens, a Savasana crewmember explained, “It’s because all the racers are pros. They don’t want to drink; they want to go home and sleep.

Riding a BIG Whirlwind

by Peter Nielsen, Posted February 25, 2010
Like a Tornado on steroids, the all-carbon-fiber Extreme 40 catamaran weighs virtually nothing and goes in a matter of seconds from merely scarily fast to oh-my-god-we’re-going-over.Americans got a taste of them a couple of years ago when the Extreme fleet put on a barnstorming sailing exhibition during the Baltimore stopover of the Volvo Ocean Race.Imagine the same kind of
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