Inshore Racing

Learning to fly

by David Schmidt, Posted April 23, 2007
The emergence of the Foiler Moth has been one of sailing’s most pyrotechnic developments. The Moth is a development class which by definition, means that it’s capable of true innovation, such as hydrofoiling at speeds up to 27.9 knots. It was only recently that Foiler Moths—the Bladerider, the Prowler, the Mistress, and the Hungry Tiger—became commercially

The 411 on College Sailing

by Sail Staff, Posted September 6, 2006
There are currently 154 collegiate sailing teams competing across the country. Each team belongs to one of seven regional districts. The majority of schools have fleets of either Flying Juniors (FJs) or 420s, but a few programs, including Tufts, Bowdoin, and Harvard, sail a fleet of Larks. Many schools also have a few Lasers so that sailors can train for singlehanded championships throughout the

12-Meter Team Building

by Sail Staff, Posted June 14, 2006
In sports, as in the workplace, success often depends on how a diverse group of people coalesce into a team. And there is nothing like sailing/racing with a group of colleagues aboard graceful 12 meters with historic pedigrees to get everyone pulling in the same direction. Competitive juices were flowing but the mood was friendly. The weather was gorgeous, and we smiled at the thought of a

We gotta regatta

by Sail Staff, Posted January 30, 2006
There's something to be said for a woman who defied all odds and doctors, living for four years when they predicted her life expectancy to be no more than a few short weeks. That something took the form of the We Gotta Regatta, this year’s North American National Access Dinghy Championship dedicated to the memory of Dell Darby who passed away on January 11, 2006.
As far as we know, the first course racing for kites, anywhere, is taking place this year on the San Francisco cityfront. For years now kites have been a familiar, colorful feature in the waters off Crissy Field, which is located just inside the Golden Gate and right in the mouth of the wind funnel. The kite sailors do their going-fast bit, and they do their flying through the air bit, and for
Olympic sailing launched on a low note—the 1896 races in Greece were cancelled for lack of wind—but there have been many high points since. Olympic sailors have created a wonderful legacy. By way of example, we tip our hats to the great ...Paul Elvström for the longest Olympic "moment" ever. It's been a show to watch, from the gritty determination that led him to

A handicapper speaks

by Sail Staff, Posted June 4, 2004
By Bruce Bingman, Technical Chair for PHRF on the ChesapeakeI think the real issue is what kind of racing do sailors want. The problem is that different sailors want different kinds and different levels of racing, but usually there are not enough boats in any one group to be able to offer a specific class and/or start. The USSAILING website offers information on "golf
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