Cup Watch

Somewhere out there, America’s Cup 2013 is being won right now. During the recess before AC45 World Series racing resumes in April in Naples, Italy, design and engineering teams are racing to complete the first generation of AC72 catamarans eligible to race in America’s Cup 34.
“If you’re making 25 knots upwind and 40 knots downwind, tacking on someone and gassing them just isn’t happening,” Cayard says. “In seriously-overpowered boats, the match will be about who can actually get the boat around the course and figure out how to avoid that extra gybe that costs you maybe 20 seconds, maybe 250 meters.”

Television Worth Watching

by MacDuff Perkins, Posted September 15, 2011
In one of the more brilliant moves in modern sailing, the America’s Cup has opted to make live-streaming coverage of AC45 World Series events free and available to anyone with a computer.   Broadcasting straight from Plymouth, England, World Series coverage began on Monday, September 12, featuring fleet racing in both 40 and 18-minute races. GPS trackers onboard the boats tracked everything

AC45s Take on Cascais

by Sarah Eberspacher, Posted August 9, 2011
The opening two days of the first-ever World Series racing in the 34th America's Cup gave spectators in Cascais, Portugal, plenty of brilliant views of the lightning-quick AC45s. Here, SAIL brings the racing (and some of the shots) to you.   The weekend offered racing at both ends of the spectrum: Saturday dawned grim and cloudy, with conditions that normally would
Beyond aerodynamic efficiency, wings bring one special, not so obvious quality to multihull sailing — flotation. The forward element and each of three flaps in the aft element on an AC 45 are airtight and buoyant. As long as the wing stays in place, the boat will not turn turtle.I'm figuring the rest of America's Cup 34 floats, too, but that's not for lack of doomsayers on the

America's Cup Teams Announced

by Sarah Eberspacher, Posted June 17, 2011
The 34th America’s Cup teams appeared together for the first time in San Francisco this week during a press conference to announce the line-up of competitors. Already down from the 15 teams that filed to compete by the April 1 deadline, eight arrived in the 2013 host city, with a ninth to be announced in Europe next week.New to the America’s Cup is the Republic of Korea, and
Winds in the mid-20s and a small craft advisory didn’t stop Jimmy Spithill and Russell Coutts from heading out to test sail their AC45s in San Francisco Bay on Monday, June 13th. Owned by Oracle Racing, both boats were preparing to head to Cascals, Portugal later this summer for the America’s Cup World Series. But in a dramatic explosion of wind, wave, and carbon fiber, Coutts’ buried
Day Four of the Extreme Sailing Series' Istanbul stopover proved to be exactly that: extreme. In roughly 19 knots of breeze, with 11 boats gearing up for the start, Alinghi and Team Extreme suffered a classic port-starboard collision when Alinghi tried to duck below, but simply did not have enough room.Attendees reported hearing the crash from as much as 500

A Perfect 45?

by Kimball Livingston, Posted March 23, 2011
Adopting wing-sailed catamarans, inventing a new tour called the America’s Cup World Series, launching a 45-foot one-design class as a training fleet: none of this could ever have been free of controversy. The 45s went from concept—a trainer for AC sailors and race committee alike—to reality in five months, with the first “batch” of four promised for delivery to challenging teams by April 1.
The RC44 class kicked off its 2011 season in style, with thousands of shore-side spectators on hand to see the Russian flagged Katusha, with Paul Cayard calling tactics and amateur helmsman Bob Little behind the wheel, win the opening regatta in San Diego.Finishing second in the 11-boat fleet was Oracle Racing, with Russell Coutts calling tactics and owner-driver Larry
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