Sails+Rigging

Snag-Free Main Sails

by Sail Staff, Posted July 9, 2006
Sometimes you see an idea that’s so elegant in its simplicity that all you can say is, “Damn, why didn’t I think of that?” Seldn’s $155 Backstay Flicker is just such an item. It’s a fiberglass rod that bolts to the masthead crane on a fractionally rigged boat with a heavily roached main—the kind that always hangs up on the backstay. At its outer end is a small block through which the backstay is

A Sail for Riding

by Sail Staff, Posted April 9, 2006
Most boats don’t behave as well when anchored with rope rode as they do when lying to chain. They tend to sheer about much more, especially in wind-against-tide scenarios, which is bad for your nerves—and those of your neighbors. One way of coping with this is to set a riding sail on the backstay to help keep the bow pointed into the wind. You could make one of these yourself, or you could order

Power at the Push of a Button

by Sail Staff, Posted March 9, 2006
Labor-saving devices like headsail and mainsail furlers and powered anchor windlasses have become commonplace on sailboats as small as 30 feet, so it’s not surprising that the quest for an easier life is extending even further. Powered sheet winches have long been the rage on cruising boats of 50 feet and up, but this technology too has filtered downward. Lewmar’s L34 lays claim to being the

Furler with a Box

by Sail Staff, Posted March 9, 2006
Facnor says that lessons it has learned installing custom gear on top ocean-racing boats have been applied to its new headsail furlers for boats from 20 to 90 feet. The LX has a “bearing box” at the drum and head swivels, each containing two polymer bearings that reportedly spread loads evenly. A rotating tack fitting allows the furler drum and head to turn before the twin-groove luff extrusion,
  • facebook
  • twitter