Sails+Rigging

Slick A-Sail Furler

by Sail Staff, Posted March 18, 2008
Facnor’s new Asym-FX asymmetric-spinnaker furler sports a continuous furling drum, where the sail’s tack attaches, and a swivel, where the head attaches. In between is a Kevlar anti-twist luff rope with a Spectra line attached halfway up. The other end of the line is stitched to the sail’s luff. To set, hoist the sail, then ease the furling line as you take in on the sheet. To furl, reverse this

Schaefer Marine Aero Tuff Luff

by Sail Staff, Posted February 11, 2008
In 2006, Schaefer Marine released the Aero Tuff Luff (model A-1706) headstay foil, which fit forestays up to 5/16” in diameter. Now Schaefer has introduced a 2.0 version of the Aero Tuff Luff (model A-2506) for boats with headstays up to 3/8” in diameter. The twin-track foil is made from a super-strong polycarbonate material and features a fine surface finish to help mitigate friction between the

Problem Solver

by Sail Staff, Posted December 18, 2007
An override on a winch can become a big problem if you don’t have the right solution. The Spinlock ZS/OPEN is a mobile jammer that allows you to transfer a loaded line or sheet onto a different winch to fix the override, rearrange a bad lead, or deal with a spinnaker peel. Simply attach the Spinlock unit to the loaded sheet, close the unit’s jaws (jammer), and transfer the load. The semicustom

Ties That Bind

by Sail Staff, Posted October 9, 2007
If your boat is equipped with Karver blocks, you can now add an additional upgrade by investing in Karver’s rope shackles (compatible with KB6, KB8, KB10, KN12, KB8c, KB10C, and KB12C blocks). The rope shackles are lighter per given strength rating than stainless steel shackles, won’t scratch up your deck, and are noiseless. Moreover, the rope shackles are purported to be easier to open than

Code-0 Furler

by Sail Staff, Posted August 16, 2007
Karver first made heads spin in 2004 with its K-Blocks; now it’s spinning sails and saving weight aloft with the new line of K.F. Furlers. The basic unit includes Karver’s swivel and furling drum; your sailmaker will build your Code 0 with an ultrastrong synthetic luff cord that attaches directly to this hardware. To use, simply raise the halyard, unfurl the sail using the continuous furler line,

Carbon Spun

by Sail Staff, Posted August 16, 2007
Here’s a case of grand-prix trickle-down you can benefit from: Lewmar’s new Grand Prix Carbon Fiber 99 winch was specifically designed for the Open 60 and Volvo 70 classes, but it can also handle the loads generated by other large, powerful yachts. The unit’s drum diameter is just under 9 inches; the winch offers a power ratio of 101:1 and has a wide bearing track to accept lines and sheets from

Smooth Spinners

by Sail Staff, Posted July 10, 2007
Blocks are rarely noticed—unless they fail or slow you down. Ronstan’s new Orbit blocks are both light and strong, thanks to their polymer-and-fiber construction, and are packed with enough features and options that you’ll notice them. There are currently 18 configurations of Series 55 blocks that are aimed at a variety of applications on boats into the 30-foot range; larger 70mm Orbit blocks are

Weight Watchers

by Sail Staff, Posted July 10, 2007
Looking for a lightweight, silky-smooth block that won’t shy away from a serious workout? Schaefer’s new M-Series blocks come in three sizes (66mm, 82mm, and 100mm) with five attachment options (singles, webbing/lashing singles, stand-up spring, halyard lead, and foot blocks). The blocks feature Torlon rollers and Delrin ball bearings in the sheave. This combination, coupled with a

Ties That Bind

by Sail Staff, Posted March 10, 2007
Longtime European ropemaker Teufelberger recently partnered with Ronstan to distribute Teufelberger’s FSE Robline sailing ropes around the world. These ropes cover the full gamut of sailing needs, from all-around docking and mooring lines to state-of-the-art racing cords that have been proven on Volvo Ocean 70s, America’s Cuppers, and ORMA 60 tris. The company’s proprietary impregnation system is

Knotically Challenged

by Sail Staff, Posted January 10, 2007
Knot tying isn’t easy, especially if you have small hands. With Nite Ize’s new Figure 9 rope tightener you can easily secure a dinghy to a car-top rack. Simply put the boat on your car, set up the closed-loop end of the Figure 9 (instructions are engraved on the aluminum device), pull tight, and drop the cord’s moving end into the Figure 9’s teeth. Two sizes accommodate rope diameters between 2
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