Sails+Rigging

Glowfast Marine has expanded its line of glow-in-the-dark sail tape so that cruisers can now keep tabs on sail shape during night watches, the same as racers. According to Glowfast, its luminous draft stripes can improve sail handling and performance as much as 20 percent after the sun goes down. Coupled with the company’s wide range of clutch labels, safety labels and even glow-in-the-dark

Getting Your Bearings

by Sail Staff, Posted April 5, 2011
Ronstan’s Core Blocks feature a two-stage bearing system for improved performance in sheet and halyard applications aboard both cruisers and racers. Stage one provides “ultra-low friction” when handling moderate loads. The second stage engages when the wind pipes up and loads increase. Together the two stages cut overall friction by almost half. Other features include a “flare” design to reduce

User-Friendly Furling

by Adam Cort, Posted November 23, 2010
The new NEX continuous-line Code O furler features a bright green "I-Connect" sail attachment system in both the base and swivel unit to facilitate quick sail changes using a captive pin system. The I-Connect can be operated with one hand and has no protruding parts to snag errant lines. A "Quick Fit" line-fitting system provides easy access to the furling drum so the furling line can be left on

Strong Line

by Adam Cort, Posted November 5, 2010
To manufacturer its new Ph.D. line, Yale Cordage entwines individual bundles of load-bearing, pre-stretched Honeywell Spectra S1000 strands with proprietary iGrip-treated, easy-to-grip polyester fibers. The encapsulated Spectra strands are then woven into a 12-strand, single-braid line that provides the same, or better strength than a standard double-braid, without a double-braid’s bulk and

Two New Reversible Winches

by Adam Cort, Posted September 24, 2010
Since the advent of modern winches, easing sheets under load has been problematic. Doing so requires uncleating the line or removing it from the self-tailer, a procedure fraught with hazard for the unwary—until now. In the run-up to the Annapolis Boat show, Harken and Seldn have both unveiled new self-tailers that can ease a sail under load, with your fingers safely out of the way and the line

Grab a Line with Ease

by Adam Cort, Posted September 24, 2010
The LineGrabber allows you to quickly and easily attach a line or anchor snubber at any point along another line. It can also be used in any number of other applications, from securing a coil of rope to hanging something from a backstay or securing a dock line. LineGrabbers are manufactured by the same company that makes the Shockles anchor line snubber and consist of a sewn double loop of 1/4in

Ronstan Core Block Series

by Adam Cort, Posted August 16, 2010
Ronstan’s Core Blocks include a proprietary two-stage bearing system and durable alloy cheeks. Stage one provides “ultra-low friction” when handling moderate loads. The second stage engages when the wind pipes up and loads increase. According to Ronstan, this two-stage approach cuts overall friction almost in half.Core Block cheeks are precision-shaped with an eye toward providing maximum

Flat and Fast

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2010
Facnor’s new FlatDeck furler combines the ease of single-line reefing with the low profile and mechanical advantage of a continuous-line furler. Because its hybrid furling line merges flat webbing with regular rope, the furling drum can be flatter and wider than a conventional furling drum. This creates more leverage when furling the sail and leaves more space on the forestay for the luff of the

Locked and Loaded: Antal Mini-Hook Halyard Lock

by Sail Staff, Posted March 10, 2010
Halyard locks are a fantastic way to spare your rig some mast compression. The only problem with them is that the sail can only be locked at full hoist. As soon as you reef you’re back on the halyard. To solve this problem, Antal has created the Mini Hook halyard-lock system for boats up to 40ft. Featuring a locking mechanism controlled via a pair of trip lines on the back of the headboard car,

Push Button Grinding

by David Schmidt, Posted March 1, 2010
Like thousands of other sailors, I scoffed at powered winches until a rock-climbing injury reduced my right shoulder to an arthritic mess. So, while I love to spin handles, I’ve realized that powered winches are my friends. And I’m not alone. Most medium-to-large cruising boats I saw at last year’s United States Sailboat Show at Annapolis either came fitted with some (or all) powered winches, or
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