Sails+Rigging

Push Button Grinding

by David Schmidt, Posted March 1, 2010
Like thousands of other sailors, I scoffed at powered winches until a rock-climbing injury reduced my right shoulder to an arthritic mess. So, while I love to spin handles, I’ve realized that powered winches are my friends. And I’m not alone. Most medium-to-large cruising boats I saw at last year’s United States Sailboat Show at Annapolis either came fitted with some (or all) powered winches, or

Grinding Made Easy

by Adam Cort, Posted February 26, 2010
Grinding winches can be fun—to a point. Now, for those times when you don’t feel like building arm strength there’s the WinchRite, from Sailology LLC, a fully portable electric winch handle that makes everything from raising the main to furling in the genoa a snap.Designed specifically for sailing, the WinchRite provides up to 100 newton meters of torque and rotation speeds from 50 to 120

Custom Cut

by David Schmidt, Posted November 19, 2009
Synthetic rigging has come of age. Colligo Marine is now taking orders for made-to-order twelve-strand Dynex Dux (pre-stretched Dyneema SK-75) shrouds, backstays, and forestays (and other standing rigging), which are compatible with either lashing or turnbuckle-style tensioning systems. Colligo claims that the synthetic rigging is roughly the same cost as stainless-steel wire shrouds but is only

Harken Radial Winches

by David Schmidt, Posted November 2, 2009
Harken made a big announcement at the 2009 U.S. Sailboat Show at Annapolis: A new line of winches, called the Radials. But unlike other “new” winches that are merely a 2.0 version of an existing product, Harken literally started with a blank sheet of paper and built from the ground up. The resulting winches are lighter, more efficient, safer, easier to install, and easier to upgrade to powered

Softies

by David Schmidt, Posted June 19, 2009
Adios steel shackles, hello Softies. These soft shackles (they can also do double duty as hanks for headsails) are spliced from a single length of Dyneema SK75 and come in two sizes, the smaller of which has a safe working load of 2,000 pounds, while the larger can handle 4,000 pounds: impressive numbers, given the unit’s light weight. While sailors have been handcrafting soft shackles for
Over the years, Hall Spars has developed a solid reputation for building high-end performance masts and booms. More recently, it announced its new line of Hall Seamless Carbon Rigging (SCR) 35. As the name implies, this carbon standing rigging is seamless, has the smallest frontal area possible, and has a billiard-ball smooth finish that Hall claims helps to reduce drag. The

ATN Genoa Sleeve

by David Schmidt, Posted April 14, 2009
If you have a roller-furling headsail, the ATN Genoa Sleeve is worth your attention. It’s built of abrasion-resistant, UV-proof material and protects your headsail (racing or cruising) without adding weight to the sail or requiring that it be altered. The sleeve is hoisted on a spare halyard and is laced with adjustable thin-diameter cordage that holds the sleeve snug to the sail when tightened,

Trim On!

by David Schmidt, Posted March 10, 2009
As with many Harken products, the secret to the outstanding performance behind the SpeedGrip handles are ball bearings. As with blocks, the ball bearings inside the SpeedGrip handles allow for virtually frictionless movement, which is a sure-fire recipe for translating as much of your brawn into sheeting action as possible. Harken SpeedGrip winches feature ball bearings for both the vertical

Easy Options

by Sail Staff, Posted February 6, 2009
Here’s good news for foredeck crews who have to deal with hectic sail changes and less-than-ideal sheeting angles. Harken’s new high-load snatch blocks feature an innovative soft-strop attachment system that makes life easy. The blocks currently come in four sizes (safe working loads of 5,070 pounds, 10,805 pounds, 18,080, and 26,460 pounds), and should work well in such static-line applications

Spun!

by Sail Staff, Posted September 10, 2008
By David SchmidtSeldn Masts, Inc., has a new line of deck hardware to complement its already extensive line of spars. The line currently includes a line of plane-bearing blocks, auto-ratchet blocks, ball-bearing blocks, wire blocks (for adjustable backstays), and cam cleats (some of which are swivel mounted), but Selden plans to expand into genoa tracks and cars, as well as traveler cars
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