Pittman Innovation Awards

Doyle Anomaly Headboard

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
Doyle’s Anomaly headboard solves these dilemmas by affixing the head of the sail to a detachable composite “carriage,” which is attached via a 2:1 tackle to the top sail car on the mast track. When raising sail, halyard tension automatically pulls the carriage into the car where a toggle locks it in place. No more having to attach the head of the sail to the track manually.

Cousin Trestec Constrictor

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
As a line comes under load, it is instantly squeezed by the Constrictor’s Aramid jacket and held fast. Simply pull the trip line and catch its dedicated knot in the notch to release the line. According to Cousin Trestec, the lightweight design offers slip-free performance even when working with higher loads, without the risk of abrasion.
The slippery properties of these synthetic fibers pair well with the sheave’s anodized aluminum bearing surface, yielding low-friction performance at a fraction of the weight of a traditional block. The unit attaches to padeyes or other deck/spar fittings with a Spectra strop held in situ by a Velcro strip.

Karver Flying Cam Cleat

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
“Every sailor’s ditty bag ought to have one of these things in it,” proclaimed one of our judges. Many of those ditty bags will, of course, belong to racers (dinghy sailors in particular will like the flying cleat for handling loaded working lines more comfortably), but we think cruisers will ultimately find the most creative uses.

Spinlock Pylon LED

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The Spinlock Pylon LED lifejacket antenna solves a problem inherent to any conventional emergency light attached to a lifejacket. Namely, when deployed, the light is intermittently blocked either by waves or the victim’s head, making it hard to see in a seaway.

Kannad Marine R10 SRS

by Sail Staff, Posted January 10, 2012
The SafeLink can be clipped to a lifejacket and transmits continuously for 24 hours when activated. A flashing LED helps rescuers make visual contact when homing in on the signal after dark. Although the device has not yet been authorized by the FCC and is therefore not for sale in the United States, it hopefully will be soon.
Each winter SAIL honors the memory of the late Freeman K. Pittman, who served as the magazine’s technical editor for 14 years, by recognizing the most innovative new products of the last 12 months in his name. For 2011, SAIL executive editor Charles J. Doane (Cruising Gear), editor-at-large David Schmidt (Racing Gear), senior editor Adam Cort (Safety Gear), electronics editor Ralph Naranjo
Sailors today live in an era replete with new equipment and innovation. Looking back on the state-of-the-art in February of 1970—when SAIL’s first issue was unveiled—you’d find aluminum was still considered a pretty high-tech material. Wooden spars were still relatively common. Electronics were primitive: LORAN was top dog, and plenty of cruisers used radio direction finders when navigating out

2009 Pittman Innovation Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted February 3, 2009
As sailors we pit ourselves against the unknown, working to negotiate safe passages through ever-changing oceans and lakes and rivers in weather conditions for which the term “variable” should be considered a euphemism. While each passage or race is unique, one aspect of sailing is universal—namely, that innovation and new technology combine to make our sport easier, safer, and just plain more
Boats are complex objects containing numerous systems, parts, components, and gadgets, all of which are designed to make the sailing experience more enjoyable. Many of us sailors enjoy trying out the latest gear, be it a sail, a chartplotter, or a snatch block. And if you’ve sailed long enough, you’ve seen gear steadily improve as innovating manufacturers come up with ever-better mousetraps. If
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