Everything Else

Pocket Sword

by David Schmidt, Posted July 7, 2008
Pocket SwordIf you like folding knives with a million built-in gadgets, stop reading this review. But if you value exceptional workmanship, excellent quality materials, and the sharpest blade that this sailor has ever used — bar none — meet the Basic 3 from the studio of boutique knife maker David Boye. After using countless stainless-steel diving knives that always end

Trailer Envy

by David Schmidt, Posted May 22, 2008
If you own an older boat, finding the right trailer can be a chore, especially if the boat is no longer in production. Luckily, there’s a solution. Meet Brian Bishop, owner of a boutique sailboat trailer company called Sailboat Transporter. After spending some frustrating time seeking a reliable, reasonably priced trailer for his Islander 36, Bishop realized that a market niche existed, which he

Illuminated: Black & Decker Bright Bar

by Sail Staff, Posted January 15, 2008
Need to shed light on your engine without tapping your house batteries? Meet Black & Decker’s cordless Bright Bar and Mini Bright Bar. The units can provide focused light, area lighting, or 360-degree lighting, depending on the space that needs illuminating. They use long-life LED bulbs, which are reported to provide up to 10,000 hours of bulb life, and have an adjustable swivel-hanging hook for

Trap Strap

by Sail Staff, Posted November 18, 2007
Hanging it out on the wire is one of the most exciting aspects of dinghy sailing; being thrown forward and taking the full-value “around-the-world” ride around the forestay is one of the scariest. Using a fixed footstrap can lead to serious injury in the event of capsizing or pitchpoling. The new AquaStrap is a releasable footstrap made out of high-grade polymers; it can be screwed or riveted

Swing Time

by Sail Staff, Posted September 16, 2007
Nothing beats lounging in a hammock with a good book after a sail. Cool Net Hammocks recently introduced its namesake product, which is easily set up via a three-point connection system. The hammock can be attached either forward of the mast (attaching to the forestay, the mast, and a shroud) or behind it (using a shroud, the mast, and the backstay), depending on your boat’s layout. The hammocks

Sliced and Diced

by Sail Staff, Posted September 16, 2007
Besides nationality, what do the Swiss America’s Cup syndicate Alinghi and knife manufacturer Wenger have in common? Answer: A partnership that has produced a well-thought-out, sailing-specific knife. The Alinghi Knife features the best pliers I’ve ever seen on a folding knife, a locking blade, a line gauge, various screwdrivers, and a spike—all designed to help you MacGyver yourself out of tight

Map Lover’s Delight

by Sail Staff, Posted August 16, 2007
Charts and maps are one of sailing’s great legacies, as most exploring expeditions brought back charts of previously unknown waters as part of the trip’s bounty. Now, Latitude Kinsale of Ireland makes handmade, custom, three-dimensional to-scale maps, allowing sailors of a different era to share in this same tradition. Below-water topography is clearly discernable, and frame-lighting options make

Deck Key for Any Deck

by Sail Staff, Posted July 10, 2007
Have you ever arrived at a busy fuel dock, waited in line, tied up at the dock and prepared to fill up with fuel or water—and then realized that the only deck key you can locate doesn’t fit all of your deck caps? Sailor’s Solutions’s universal deck key can be easily adjusted to fit any common-sized deck cap, and it will accept a 3/8-inch drive ratchet to tackle deck caps that are hard to budge.

Weatherly

by Sail Staff, Posted June 16, 2007
If you love historic boats and like to keep an eye on the weather, Majestic Weathervanes’s line of high-end rooftop accoutrements is worth a look. Built of aluminum and steel, each weathervane is an exact replica of a historic vessel, built to its original blueprints. These models-cum-vanes are designed to withstand anything short of an asteroid hit; one vane dropped from a height of 20 feet, was

Chill Zone

by Sail Staff, Posted June 16, 2007
One of the great pleasures of cruising is enjoying a glass of fine wine aboard. Keeping the bottles at a constant temperature and humidity level and protecting them from damaging UV rays and bottle-breaking vibrations isn’t easy. U-Line Corporation’s 1115WC Wine Captain provides a triple-temperature-zone system that keeps red, white, and sparkling wines at their various optimum temperatures via a
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