Everything Else

Well Suited Anchors

by Sail Staff, Posted April 5, 2011
Sailors have always struggled with the question of what to do with their anchors when underway. All that weight and those sharp edges are fine when hooking onto a gravelly bottom, but can wreak havoc onboard. Enter the AnchorSuit, a neoprene wetsuit-type cover for use on fluke-style anchors. By softening an anchor’s impact points, the AnchorSuit not only protects your boat’s gelcoat and

Know Your Level

by Adam Cort, Posted March 8, 2011
Since time immemorial, an aura of mystery has surrounded the tanks holding fuel, water and waste aboard a sailboat. Enter the Gobius tank measuring system, which uses vibrations to determine how full a tank is. Each Gobius includes a control unit and a series of sensors, each equipped with a “shaker” and an accelerator to create a “knock and listen” system to determine if there is liquid on the

Saved!

by Sail Staff, Posted November 18, 2010
The Petzl e+LITE is one of the few pieces of kit to make it on to my must-have list. The headlamp has one red and three white LED bulbs on a tiny swivel-mounted head. A selection switch makes it easy to choose from the e+LITE’s different settings, even with gloves on; its storage mode ensures that the light won’t accidentally illuminate your pocket. The headlamp has five settings: regular white,

The Color of Safety

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2010
After years of manufacturing orange liferafts, Viking Life-Saving Equipment is now making its rafts fluorescent yellow. Viking made the switch after extensive testing showed that yellow shows up better against the grays and blues of the ocean, as well as in fog. Viking has incorporated the color into its upgraded RescYou line of rafts, which also features a blue inner lining that is said to have

Crucial Equipment

by David Schmidt, Posted February 11, 2010
Chandleries are rife with good folding sailing knives. Selecting the right one often comes down to utility and taste. While the latter quality is subjective, utility is easy to quantify. I’ve been using the Gerber Crucial Tool for several months and I’ve been impressed with its clever design, fantastic utility, and small size and minimal weight (just 5 ounces). While a sharp, locking blade is

Blocked

by Sail Staff, Posted November 23, 2009
Not all sunscreens are created equal. Some run the second they get wet or sweaty; others burn the living hell out of your eyes, while others fail to properly protect you from the sun. As with many sailors who have spend decades on the water, I have had a few little skin problems and have been advised to use the heartiest sun block on the market Meet ZBlok, a new sunscreen that’s water and sweat

Toys for the Boys (and Girls)

by Tom Nunlist, Posted August 18, 2009
Summer sailing and fun in the water go hand-in-hand, and there’s nothing like a few water toys to keep younger crews amused in those quiet anchorages. The limited stowage on most sailboats rules out carrying traditional kayaks or windsurfers on board, so we thought we’d try out a selection of inflatable/collapsible playtime gear. As SAIL’s intern, I was volunteered to be the “splash-test

Harbinger Laser Bathymetric Maps

by Sail Staff, Posted June 19, 2009
Few charts are as interesting as Harbinger Laser’s 3D bathymetric maps, which cover the Great Lakes, as well as smaller inland lakes and nationwide coastal regions. But what sets these maps apart is the company’s signature Lighthouse Map Series, which feature a digital-picture viewer, in addition to Harbinger Laser’s high-quality wooden topographical maps, which are made from Michigan-grown wood.
Given the inherent dangers of sailing, it’s good to know some manufacturers think extra hard about safety aboard. Spinlock is one of those companies, as evidenced by its new line of cruising-oriented ZR Jammers. The UK-based company recognizes the potential for injury when a sailor releases the lever on a highly loaded clutch. Its new ZR 1014 Jammer has no control lever; instead, there’s a
Some sailors are born with saltwater rushing through their veins and an ironclad stomach that can weather the worst of blows. I, however, am not one of those sailors. While I like to think that my blood has more than its fair share of salinity, I’m a frequent visitor to the leeward rail in lumpy conditions. Until now, that is. While everybody’s body reacts differently to various medications – and
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