Electronics+Navigations

Tacktick T104 Instruments

by Peter Nielsen, Posted December 21, 2009
I’d been thinking about installing new sailing instruments for a year before I finally took the plunge. The difficulty of choosing between several excellent makes was one problem. Another was the hassle factor; the significant amount of labor involved in running cables around the boat and installing the display heads. This accounts for much of the cost of upgrading instruments. The more I thought

Keep Your Monitor in the Clear

by Adam Cort, Posted December 21, 2009
All too often the problem with cockpit navigation monitors is keeping them in clear view when you’re under sail. Take a seat immediately behind the helm, and life is good. But find a comfy perch steering to windward, and the next thing you know you’re continually having to crane your neck to keep an eye on where you are with respect to those pesky shallows off to leeward; same can be said for

FLIR, Hall Spars Win Awards

by David Schmidt, Posted November 19, 2009
Few honors have more prestige in the marine equipment field than the DAME Awards, which are decided at the METS trade show in Amsterdam in mid-November. The entries represent some of the most forward-thinking advances in marine aftermarket equipment. They are also a litmus test for the health of the industry: the more innovative products on show, the more effort is being put into R&D and product

MN30

by David Schmidt, Posted August 5, 2009
Spend enough time sailing and you’ll eventually lose your masthead anemometer. Sometimes big winds or storms will take them out; seabirds also think they’re a handy place to perch. When it breaks or needs replacing, wouldn’t it be nice to simply remove the old anemometer and screw in the new one, no wires or connectors involved? For years, Tacktick has been making high-quality, wireless,

McMurdo Fast Find

by David Schmidt, Posted August 5, 2009
McMurdo has introduced two new Fast Find emergency personal-locator beacons that broadcast on both 121.5 and 406 MHz. Once activated, the units broadcast for 24 hours. Both come loaded with an SOS LED light that flashes the Morse code SOS pattern. According to McMurdo, most emergency signals that are broadcast on the 406 MHz signal are “heard” within 3 to 45 minutes; it then takes 3 additional

Navigation Gear

by Sail Staff, Posted June 15, 2009
Despite challenging economic conditions, the range and quality of new electronic product introductions has exceeded expectations. That’s good news for sailors, because there are lots of exciting choices out there for those who want to outfit a new boat or upgrade existing equipment.Lowrance have upped the ante in the battle for supremacy in multifunction navigation

Puckster

by Sail Staff, Posted May 15, 2009
If you sail on a small boat without electronics, you may appreciate having some basic speed and heading data to help dial in your tactics and sail trim. Velocitek’s new Speedpuck is a handheld GPS receiver that displays your course and speed over ground and allows you to record—and later download—the data so you can compare your performance against other boats. This clever device also displays

Look, Ma, No Hands!

by David Schmidt, Posted April 14, 2009
If you’re a high-adrenaline sailor, V.I.O.’s new Point of View (POV) video camera is perfect for documenting your onboard adventures. The package includes the recorder, a wireless remote, the camera head (which has a 100-degree field of view), various wires, mounting accessories, and a 1GB memory card (larger cards are available). It is waterproof and shock resistant, so even
Energy-conscious sailors worldwide are exchanging their incandescent bulbs for LED lights. LEDs work well in many applications, but some sailors find the beam they cast is too diffused to clearly spot distant objects. Pelican’s Stealthlite Rechargeable 2460 uses a rechargeable NiMH battery pack to power its strong, focused LED beam. It should allow you to spot buoys or

Channel Surfing

by Sail Staff, Posted February 6, 2009
When I started sailing, 50 years ago, electronic gear was a rarity. In fact, a knotmeter was the only electronic device aboard the first boat I sailed on. Obviously, things have evolved a lot since then. An onboard TV was once the sole province of the wealthy, but now they’re becoming increasingly common, even on fairly small boats. Some cruisers hate the idea, while others can’t do without
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