Profiles

Is it the dandelions he regularly eats, or the well water he drinks at home in Port Clinton, Ohio? Whatever it is, it’s working for Tom Corogan, who at the age of 84 is making his sixth attempt to round Cape Horn—solo  
The ARC, which starts each November in the Canary Islands, is very much a European event and the Americans who run it are often a bit out of the ordinary. Without doubt, the least ordinary American boat in this last edition of the rally was the Gunboat 66 Phaedo.
AFTER TWO BOATS HAD BEEN ABANDONED, after people had been hospitalized, after we finally (and gratefully) reached the safety of Virgin Gorda, Steve Black, who had organized the rally, held a "debriefing" session."This is not something anyone would go through willingly," he explained to the crowd. "It's important that sailors have short memories."

The Top Community Sailing Centers of 2011

by Meghan Dente, Posted November 6, 2011
Out of 500 organizations, nine were chosen as US Sailing's Top Community Sailing Centers of 2011. Here's a look at the winners.

The Rallying Kind

by Charles J. Doane, Posted October 31, 2011
I’ve been on both sides of the fence when it comes to cruising rallies. My very first transatlantic experiences, way back in 1992, were in two cruising rallies organized by Jimmy Cornell, the man who can rightfully lay claim to having invented the concept when he launched the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC), from the Canaries to the West Indies, in 1986.

A Mermaid Muse

by Sarah Eberspacher, Posted October 31, 2011
The sailors of old may have filled their free time with activities like scrimshaw and fancy knot work. But during a recent yearlong cruise with her family, 8-year-old Emily Ehlers (now 12) stayed busy creating a new card game, which is now being marketed under the name “Mermaid Beach.”   A native of Portland, Oregon, Emily, her parents and two brothers sailed their 42-foot Pearson 424,

Air and Water

by Adam Cort, Posted October 31, 2011
Most sailors only go aloft when necessary—either to do some kind of repair or maybe to get a better view while picking their way into a strange harbor. For French sailors Franck Rabilier and Delphine Lechifflart, though, messing about in their boat’s rigging is the most natural thing in the world. Currently partway through a circumnavigation, the two acrobats have staged dozens of performances at

SAIL Magazine Rewind: Little Jonah and the Hurricane

by Douglas Jones, Posted September 21, 2011
This story was originally published in the August 1995 issue of

Sailing Sense: The Quiet Stranger

by Robbert Das, Posted June 17, 2011
Originally published in the February 2009 issueNo one really knows what inspired Harry Young, a 38-year-old British sailor who’d been staying in New York, to sail solo across the Atlantic. It’s also not clear why he made the passage in a small boat he’d designed and built himself and hadn’t bothered to name, though some think Young had been up to some mischief in New York and

A Passage to Africa

by Duncan Gould, Posted May 9, 2011
“When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”Baseball legend Yogi Berra gets credit for that advice, but it sort of encapsulated our motivation for the coming cruise.Our 39-foot steel cutter, Moose, was sailing out through the pass at Mayotte, a French island between Mozambique and Madagascar, bound for Ilha de Moambique, just off the African mainland. After a
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