Profiles

Rather than junior sailing lessons, David Tunick, 68, of New York City, learned sailing by “on-the-job” experience. While his family drove powerboats, he and a friend bought a Lightning in 1966 and started “sleeping-bag cruising.”
Sailing has always been a priority for Elsie Hulsizer, 66, of Seattle, Washington. Her love affair with Northwest sailing was launched when she was 12 and her father built an 18-foot Robert’s Knockabout.
Betty Nissen had a dream for a life at sea. Sixty years ago, she and her husband, John, co-founded what is now the largest organization for voyaging cruisers in the world.
"Matt Rutherford is a better sailor than you are." I wrote that in June 2010, right after Matt had returned from his second singlehanded transatlantic passage—which included runs across the North Sea and Bay of Biscay...

Catching Up with Wendy Hinman

by David Schmidt, Posted September 12, 2012
Some cruisers wait for the perfect boat; others simply go. Wendy Hinman (48) and her husband, Garth Wilcox (52), of Seattle, Washington, paid off their mortgage early and just went.
Ned Cabot recently died in a tragic accident aboard Cielita along the coast of Newfoundland. The following interview took place in May. 
Growing up in a distinguished sailing family has its advantages, but as Sheila McCurdy discovered, nothing trumps experience. Her late father, Jim McCurdy (of McCurdy & Rhodes Naval Architects), loved racing, but mainly sailed offshore with clients until he designed Selkie, the family’s 38-foot sloop, in 1986.
Henry “Hank” Strauss, still tack-sharp at 97, had to give up sailing solo a few years back but still regularly gets out on San Francisco Bay with friends. His lifetime in sailing spans the evolution of cruising under sail as we know it. 
The best piece of boat-buying advice I received was this: buy the boat that suits your present needs, not the boat you dream you will need. We keep our big-boat desires in check by chartering in the Caribbean and New Zealand, but a trailer-sailer suits most of my needs.
In what he has dubbed the Pink Boat Project, Watson plans to sail around the world non-stop in his 1960 Pearson Triton Hull to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He will be the first to circumnavigate the world starting from San Francisco and making his way east.
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