Profiles

Growing up in a distinguished sailing family has its advantages, but as Sheila McCurdy discovered, nothing trumps experience. Her late father, Jim McCurdy (of McCurdy & Rhodes Naval Architects), loved racing, but mainly sailed offshore with clients until he designed Selkie, the family’s 38-foot sloop, in 1986.
Henry “Hank” Strauss, still tack-sharp at 97, had to give up sailing solo a few years back but still regularly gets out on San Francisco Bay with friends. His lifetime in sailing spans the evolution of cruising under sail as we know it. 
The best piece of boat-buying advice I received was this: buy the boat that suits your present needs, not the boat you dream you will need. We keep our big-boat desires in check by chartering in the Caribbean and New Zealand, but a trailer-sailer suits most of my needs.
In what he has dubbed the Pink Boat Project, Watson plans to sail around the world non-stop in his 1960 Pearson Triton Hull to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He will be the first to circumnavigate the world starting from San Francisco and making his way east.
If you haven’t started following Pat and Ali Schulte’s blog on our sister site, Sailfeed.com, you’re missing out on the following: intimate details of the day-to-day of circumnavigating with young kids, adorable snapshots of said kids, lessons learned when fixing a boat in a foreign country and the distinct sense of pleasure that comes with dictating the terms of your own life.
In the next few months, Summerville and fellow sailor Steve Cockerill will sail the 115 nautical miles between Dublin, Ireland, and Southport, England, to raise money for mental health awareness and sailing support services. Sailing on Lasers, their journey will take between 12 and 15 hours to complete, depending on conditions.
Stanley Aaron Dashew couldn't wait to show off his boat. The careful engineering. The attention to detail. It was all ready for some long-distance voyaging, but, frankly, he’ll never get to do that again, because at this point he can't walk, and he can't talk. 
Frank Butler started out as a guy who just liked to make stuff, which is pretty much how he’s ended up, as well. It’s a California story, for the most part, and yes, in some ways it has been “a long strange trip.” 
The prospect of sailing 4,500 miles across the South Pacific on a 48-foot sailboat with two small children and a wife prone to seasickness is enough to make most sane skippers back away in terror. Lucky for me, my not-so-sane husband saw it as the chance of a lifetime. So in May of 2008, we cast off from Honolulu aboard our Swan 48, Sundance, with our two children, Sofia Maria, 5, and Rufo, 4, and threw ourselves to the wind.
While the majority of bluewater cruisers take to the seas kid-free, there are a brave few who manage to raise a family while cruising. It’s not a well-worn path, but teenage cruisers Gina and Fransisco Rowe wouldn’t think of following another.  
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