Profiles

Sailing in Home Waters

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 26, 2014
Admit it: there’s something unbeatable about sailing in your home waters. You know every tidal pattern, every obscured rock and every fluky habit of the wind. You could navigate with your eyes closed, though you’d never close your eyes, for fear of missing out on the scenery.
He was more tentative going forward on deck and his sore shoulder made getting out of the dinghy awkward. Would this be his last summer on the boat, especially now that he’s 15?

Five Families Prove that Sailing is a Family Affair

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 4, 2014
Whether it’s racing with dad, weekending with a baby or circumnavigating with the whole tribe, these five families are proving that sailing brings them together

Taking on Trash with the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean

by Rachel Kashdan, Posted July 30, 2014
The scientists, researchers and crew at the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean are on a mission to hunt down ocean debris aboard the 60-foot “green” research sailboat, American Promise.
SAIL Magazine's Editor Peter Nielsen offers an opinion on the matter of compulsory lifejacket use...

Hitchsailing Around the World

by Wynne Hedlesky, Posted April 29, 2014
In March of 2011 we hatched a plan: cast off and circumnavigate the globe under sail. There was just one problem. Although our plan was truly an epic one...

Katie, Jessie and the Lovely Louise

by Jessie Zevalkink, Posted October 25, 2013
Besides following in my father’s footsteps, I am still trying to comprehend how we got here. Just my best friend and me, attempting to stay warm.
“This life is so incredibly rich with memories,” says SAILFeed blogger Behan Gifford, who has been cruising with her family for five years.

Swap your Crew

by Anne-Marie Fox, Posted August 19, 2013
It all started midway through a cruise on Mexico’s Sea of Cortez when we were having dinner aboard Born Free and Chris of Starship announced: “Anne-Marie [his wife] and I have been talking and she agrees, we should do a partner swap.” An uncomfortable silence followed as I failed to respond.  
The 17-foot Old Town sailing canoe that we learned to sail in the 1970s was perfect for camping on the shores of the distant Bahamas. It was small enough for the two of us to lift in and out of the water, but still big enough to carry our camping gear, food, water, clothes and a typewriter. Granted, it did not have enough room to carry us as well. But that is another story.
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