Cruising Tips

“We’ll only be out for an hour,” he promised, and I decided to believe him. The wind out on Lake Ontario was light, the seas were calm, and despite there being some dark clouds in the distance, it looked like a great afternoon for a sail.
For many cruisers with simple electrical needs, a laptop computer can be the biggest power hog onboard. On our Creekmore 34, Eurisko, we need a laptop not only for my writing, but for our three homeschoolers.

Nifty Winch-Handle Holder

by Don Street, Posted December 20, 2012
It’s always nice to have dedicated spots on deck or in the cockpit for stowing winch handles. But the various pre-made molded-plastic or fancy fabric holders out there can be surprisingly costly, when all you really need is a short length of PVC pipe.

Crossing Seas with Kids

by Amy Schaefer, Posted December 19, 2012
What could be more relaxing and peaceful? Until you hear cries of, “Dad! My Barbie shoes went down the bilge!”, “Mom! James is sick again!” or the ever popular “I’m hungry!”

Compass Mask

by Connie McBride, Posted December 18, 2012
 Sunlight is not good for your compass. The liquid inside gets cloudy over time, making it hard to read a heading.

Drain your Rudder

by Bill Bleyer, Posted December 11, 2012
When I bought my first cruising sailboat, I falsely assumed the rudder was watertight. I later learned otherwise when I began seeing rust streaks at the seams.

Clearing an Anchor Rode

by David Emsellem, Posted December 6, 2012
Here’s a simple trick I’ve used many times to clear a rope anchor rode caught on a keel. First, I get out my 15lb mushroom dinghy anchor and attach it to the snap shackle...

Best Stern Anchors

by Peter Nielsen, Posted November 29, 2012
If you’re getting into serious cruising, there will be times when you want to set a stern anchor. Usually this involves emptying fenders, lines and whatnot out of a cockpit locker until you unearth the kedge and its rode.

Don't Over Trim

by Charles J. Doane, Posted November 28, 2012
Next time the wind goes soft, instead of submitting to this self-fulfilling prophesy of slow-going, try opening up the slot between your mainsail and headsail.
One of the best things about being retired is that it allows me to spend some quality time doing what I really like. One such escape—wife willing—is a month-long stay on my sailboat on San Francisco Bay.
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