Cruising News

Sailing is notably safe among adventure sports, so safe, in fact, there may be a tendency to regard serious accidents as anomalous freaks from which little can be learned. This is a mistake.
Given the current state of the economy, it’s no wonder new boat sales are suffering. Buying a new sailboat is a considerable financial commitment that can be difficult to justify, but when you see the boat you really want, it’s hard to deny yourself!
If you were thinking you’d run out of places to sail, think again. As of May 25, 2012 the inland waterways of Russia are now open to foreign-flagged vessels for recreational purposes.
The uses for AIS—Automatic Identification System—continue to evolve far beyond the original intention of collision avoidance for large ships. The first AIS-equipped Personal Locator Beacons have just gone on sale.
In the early 1990s, my husband, Monty, and I took early retirement, stepped aboard our Gulfstar 39, Salsa, and didn’t come back to our home in Marblehead, Massachusetts, for five years.
The International Rescue Group delivers humanitarian aid by boat. When a natural disaster strikes, it can take humanitarian aid programs weeks to mobilize and ship in resources. But what if those resources could already be nearby? That’s where the International Rescue Group (IRG) comes in.  
LightSquared, the company that hopes to build a broadband cellular telephone network that has been shown to interfere with GPS signals, has filed for voluntary Chapter 11 restructuring in the wake of the FCC’s decision to not grant it permission to move ahead with its original plans.
In the next few months, Summerville and fellow sailor Steve Cockerill will sail the 115 nautical miles between Dublin, Ireland, and Southport, England, to raise money for mental health awareness and sailing support services. Sailing on Lasers, their journey will take between 12 and 15 hours to complete, depending on conditions.

Vanishing Sail

by Lindsey Silken, Posted May 4, 2012
Of the hundreds of sailing vessels that were introduced by Scottish settlers in the 19th century and launched in the West Indies, very few remain. Filmmaker Alexis Andrews is documenting the boatbuilders of Carriacou in the Grenadines, who are trying to keep this dying skill alive.
Bahamian reefs, which have suffered for years from over-fishing, pollution and plastic waste, now have a new environmental menace to contend with.  Fortunately, this one is delicious.
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