Cruising Grounds

It's a Shoal Draft Thing

by Ida Little, Posted August 14, 2012
Few can enjoy the inner passages of the Florida Keys quite like diehard thin-water sailors, such as Ida Little and her husband aboard Thorfinn.
During the gloomy winter of 2011, while temperatures in Minneapolis hovered around -10F, my fiancée, Christine, and I made a pledge to sail as many of Minnesota’s lakes as possible in one summer.
If you were thinking you’d run out of places to sail, think again. As of May 25, 2012 the inland waterways of Russia are now open to foreign-flagged vessels for recreational purposes.
If happiness is in the journey, then ecstasy is in the destination—just ask a trailer-sailor. Neither long road trips nor unfamiliar waters intimidate these stalwarts, who are always on the lookout for a new place to splash.

Cat Love

by Christine Nguyen, Posted June 19, 2012
Sailing started out for me with a simple dream. I always wanted to have my own little boat where I could take her out on the ocean. I grew up in Huntington Beach, California, where my family spent many summers at the beach. At the pier, I would gaze longingly at the sailboats as they launched.
The three of us were still in foulies. We settled into the cockpit, the first time we could truly sit down and relax together in 23 days. Somehow we made the anchorage before dark, but only just. Since we had first sighted land some 50 miles off, at exactly noon, we had been racing the sunset.
My wife, Irene, and I had spent a very happy year in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa. We had no security issues, and we saw incredible game. We got to watch a leopard groom himself in the early light of New Year’s Day and almost drove our 4x4 into a wallow with two startled rhinos.

Vanishing Sail

by Lindsey Silken, Posted May 4, 2012
Of the hundreds of sailing vessels that were introduced by Scottish settlers in the 19th century and launched in the West Indies, very few remain. Filmmaker Alexis Andrews is documenting the boatbuilders of Carriacou in the Grenadines, who are trying to keep this dying skill alive.
Cruising the Great Lakes has one drawback: you don’t see many whales or dolphins, or frigatebirds or puffins, for that matter. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still have plenty of equally meaningful brushes with nature.
From June to September, the Cove is open to the public, and twenty families live and work there together. In the off-season, the number decreases to 12 residents and fuel and water are only available three days a week. In the words of another local, “Refuge Cove is for the sort of people who max out after three months of socializing.
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