Boats

X-40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The new X-40 is a chip off the old block. Flush with the success of the X-43 and X-46, X-Yachts designer Niels Jeppesen has drawn this new 40-footer to be as sexy, sturdy, comfortable, and responsive as its larger siblings. And it seems to have all the necessary ingredients. The cored hull is light and stiff, the sailplan has power to burn, and the hand-polished teak joinery is sure to turn some

Hunter 33

by Sail Staff, Posted August 24, 2004
It appears that designer Glenn Henderson is systematically redesigning the entire Hunter line. He's already drawn 21-, 35-, 41-, and 44-footers and now he's turned his computer mouse and designer's eye on the 33-footer. As with Henderson's previous designs, the new Hunter 33 carries its beam well aft to provide for considerable interior volume. The boat has a large aft master

Etap 37s

by Tom Dove, Posted August 23, 2004
After sailing two or three hundred boats, I thought there would be no utterly novel features for me to discover aboard the next one. I was mistaken. Boat designers are a creative lot, and when they're engineers as well, the result can be a vessel loaded with innovative features. The Belgian-built Etap 37 is just such a package of pleasant surprises. Or maybe I shouldn't be surprised; after all, a

Gunboat 34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 23, 2004
Flush with the success of the aggressive Gunboat 62, Peter Johnstone and multihull designers Morelli & Melvin have brought the same go-fast and go-comfortable approach to the new Gunboat 34. It's designed to be easy to singlehand and to easily log double-digit speeds under sail. All lines lead to the helm station, which is located in the center of the open bridgedeck under a hardtop. Living

Bruckmann 50

by Sail Staff, Posted August 23, 2004
Mark Ellis drew the lines for the Bruckmann 50, a seamanlike motorsailer that was originally called the Bruckmann 480; overall length is actually a fraction over 51 feet. Two private cabins forward lead into a very full galley to port and a nav station and relaxation area to starboard. There are dual steering stations, one at the forward end of the pilothouse and a second at the aft end of the

Stellar 53

by Sail Staff, Posted July 20, 2004
Sparkman & Stephens has a reputation that other design firms would kill for. The list of classic S&S boats reads like a who's who of notable designs of the twentieth century. With the new Stellar 53, S&S carries the tradition into the twenty-first century. Built in New Zealand, the hull features a fine entry, moderate overhangs, and a raised-saloon layout that should serve for speedy and

Moorings 4000

by Sail Staff, Posted July 20, 2004
The Moorings's collaboration with American multihull designers Morelli & Melvin and the South African builder Robertson & Caine has resulted in the Moorings 4000 40-foot catamaran. As you would expect from The Moorings, it's an ultra-spacious cruising cat that is available for charter placement as well as via private sales. The large hardtop-protected cockpit features an outside dining area and

Wauquiez Centurion 40S

by Sail Staff, Posted July 20, 2004
There's a new generation of 40-somethings designed to appeal to other 40-somethings. I refer, of course, to the group of 40-foot cruiser-racers aimed at folks who are not over the hill but have passed the hair-shirt-racer stage of life. The Wauquiez Centurion 40s is a nice example of this type, with attractive, comfortable accommodations ensconced in a fast, handsome hull powered by a big,

Friendship 40

by Sail Staff, Posted July 19, 2004
Who says daysailers have to be small and wet? One of the newest launches from the Fontaine Design Group is neither small nor wet, but it is a daysailer. The Friendship 40 is a low-freeboard throwback to the days of graceful sheer and elegant lines. She's big enough to be comfortable in a stiff breeze, yet can be easily handled by one or two people on an afternoon daysail. The accommodations below

Nauticat 515

by Sail Staff, Posted July 19, 2004
Nauticats have always been solid, stable, and comfortable, and the newest and biggest Nauticat is no different. There's nothing radical about the Nauticat 515. Its long overhangs are something of a rarity among new cruising designs, and its displacement of nearly 53,000 pounds will make it a stately offshore passagemaker. The hull is made of meticulously hand-laid fiberglass, and the fit and
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