Boats

Melges 17

by Sail Staff, Posted February 28, 2005
With active fleets of M, C, A, and other scows racing on the Great Lakes, why are the folks up in Zenda, Wisconsin, at Melges Performance Sailboats introducing a new scow class? "We're presently losing a lot of our young sailors once they graduate out of the X-Boat, Laser, and 420," says Melges VP Andy Burdick. "The Melges 17 will bring new excitement to scow

FastCat 305 Vector-K

by Sail Staff, Posted February 25, 2005
Who says cruising catamarans must be over 40 feet long to have accommodations? The FastCat 305 Vector-K is one of several new cruising catamarans that are now being imported by African Cats US. It's only 30 feet long, but its 18-foot beam frees up sufficient interior space to house three cabins and a comfortable six-seater saloon with wrap-around exterior views. Freeboard is

Island Packet 370

by Tom Dove, Posted November 19, 2004
Many boats are compromises between conflicting desires to race and to cruise, but not this one. The Island Packet 370 has a single mission: cruising. It's now the smallest member of the Island Packet family, attracting both experienced owners moving up from smaller boats and newcomers with the means to make this their first boat.On DeckA few years ago designer Bob Johnson

Wylie 43

by Sail Staff, Posted November 19, 2004
California-based designer Tom Wylie is known for his long, slender sleds with freestanding masts, so the configuration of the new Wylie 43 should come as no surprise. It's billed as an "ultralight downwind flyer" and is aimed at the section of the market that's looking for performance in a more-affordable 43-foot package. The hull is made of a cored carbon-fiber laminate; the 4,800-pound keel

Catalina 387

by Kimball Livingston, Posted October 12, 2004
To get yourself from any Southern California harbor to Catalina Island, you're typically going to set full sail in a moderate breeze. Half a day later you'll moor in a sunny lee where you will hang out and probably socialize boat-to-boat for a few days before reaching back home to your freeway connection.That's the classic Southern California cruise weekend, and a lot of the world cruises or

Hanse 531

by Duncan Kent, Posted October 8, 2004
Hanse Yachts in Greifswald, in eastern Germany, was little heard of until the 1990s, when reunification allowed the yard to break into the worldwide production-boat market. Hanse has built fast cruising boats from 31 to 41 feet and recently launched its largest model, the 53-foot 531 that I tested off Cannes, France, this summer.On DeckThe 531's deck layout is

West Wight Potter 15/19

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
There is a reason why West Wight Potters have been in production for over 42 years. They may appear tiny compared to modern thin-water pocket cruisers, but their hard-chined hulls, simple sailplans, and economical accommodations are just as fun, safe, and effective as they were 40 years ago. Price: West Wight Potter 15, $7,395 (including sails, engine, and trailer, FOB Inglewood, CA);

Shannon Shoalsailer 32

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
All variable-draft boats depend on a fully deployed keel for windward performance. Walt Schulz of Shannon Yachts set himself the challenge of designing a 32-foot cruising boat that would sail to windward without drawing more than 30 inches. The result is the Shannon Shoalsailer, and Schulz's beamy design with dual shallow-draft bilge boards reportedly does just that. Schulz says the hull shape is

Seaward Eagle

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
At 34 feet and 10,000 pounds displacement, the Seaward Eagle is one of the larger variable-draft coastal cruising monohulls you can haul and launch from a trailer with relative ease—and you can sail it with the keel at a variety of depths. It achieves shoal-draft status thanks to its 2,500-pound retractable bulb keel. An electric winch raises and lowers the keel within a keel trunk.

MacGregor 26M

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
The MacGregor 26M is the latest version of Roger MacGregor's successful MacGregor 26X. This remarkable 26-footer can reportedly log speeds of over 21 knots under power, float in 12 inches of water, and sleep six. It has a galley and an enclosed head. Stability under sail comes from 300 pounds of permanent ballast, 1,150 pounds of easily removable water ballast in the hull, and a narrow
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