Boats

Transit 380

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
It’s easy to see why the Optimist is the boat of choice for the youngest sailors, but what’s not so clear is where those still-young sailors go when they’ve outgrown the Opti. Designer Jim Taylor and Precision Boatworks have addressed the need for a transition boat between the Opti and larger, more powerful boats like the Laser or the 420 with the new Transit 380. It’s a stable

Santa Cruz 53C

by Sail Staff, Posted June 6, 2006
Santa Cruz 53CDesigned for serious passagemakers, the new Santa Cruz 53C is a bluewater-cruising version of the company’s 52-foot racer/cruiser. While it maintains the original’s lightweight design, new cruising-friendly features include hull windows, self-tacking jib, carbon-fiber boom, optional shoal-draft keel, and a fiberglass dodger for more comfortable foul-weather sailing. The 53C boasts

Delphia 40

by Sail Staff, Posted June 6, 2006
Built as a sturdy passagemaker capable of withstanding the harshest of Baltic Sea conditions, this 40-foot Polish import carries 841 square feet of sail area, has a displacement of 18,000 pounds, and is available with a shoal or deep keel (5 feet, 6 inches/7 feet, 1 inch). The interior features 6-foot, 8-inch headroom in the saloon, mahogany joinerwork, and a choice of three- or four-cabin

Annapolis 30

by Dave Baldwin, Posted June 6, 2006
The first in Annapolis Performance Yachts’s new line, the sleek A30 is a trailerable one-design racer with a narrow beam and a light 3,800 pounds of displacement. Designed for quick acceleration and upwind stability, it features a fractional carbon-fiber rig, an asymmetric

Beneteau First 10R

by Sail Staff, Posted March 29, 2006
The 32-foot First 10R represents a new generation of Beneteau’s sleek one-design racers. Designed by Farr Yacht Design with speed as the top priority, the 10R features an aggressive sailplan, an iron blade/lead bulb combo keel, and an asymmetrical spinnaker. While it is the smallest in Beneteau’s First series, it also serves as a comfortable cruiser and is equipped with a separate head, nav
I made it a point to spend time below during my sail aboard the Catalina Morgan 440. With many brand-loyal Catalina owners getting beyond career age, the company’s first deck-saloon offering was conceived as a vacation home for some and a retirement home for others. The “house” really matters.The main cabin, with a galley convenient to the cockpit, is astonishingly big

Seawind 1160

by Kimball Livingston, Posted March 3, 2006
Wollongong, Australia, is a beautiful spot you’ve possibly never heard of. Backed by mountains south of Sydney and fronting the Tasman Sea, Wollongong is home to Seawind Catamarans, whose newest offering reinterprets the open accommodations of its popular Seawind 1000 into something larger, comfier, and better suited to offshore duty. The new 1160, at 38 feet, sails at the

Le Breton SIG45

by Dave Baldwin, Posted March 3, 2006
You have to admire Hugo Le Breton for setting the bar high with his new SIG 45. His goal was simple and ambitious: to combine the high-performance design elements of an ocean-racing multihull with the style of a contemporary cruising monohull. The result is a 45-foot racer-cruiser that comfortably accommodates six and can hit top speeds of over 20 knots. The SIG 45 features

e33

by Peter Nielsen, Posted March 3, 2006
A sailmaker, a boatbuilder, and a naval architect are standing at a bar having a quiet drink… no, this isn’t yet another incarnation of an old joke. It’s how sailmaker Robbie Doyle explains the genesis of the e33, a collaboration between him, builder Dirk Kneulman, and designer Jeremy Wurmfeld. Talk turned to the declining state of one-design racing and of what type of boat it would take to

Pittman 90

by Craig Davis, Posted January 23, 2006
Over the last decade or so, the America’s Cup and Maxi-yacht classes have benefited from most of the research money going into sailing. Today’s Maxi owners aren’t shy about pushing design far beyond what is permitted in the America’s Cup. Maxis are larger than the Cup yachts and increasingly use canting keels and water ballast to improve performance. Reichel/Pugh, German Frers,
  • facebook
  • twitter