Boats

Oyster 53

by Tom Dove, Posted September 29, 2006
Carbon-based life evolves, silicon-based computers evolve, and so do fiberglass yachts. Oyster Marine understands this principle well and through steady improvements and innovations has established new standards for all its designs and systems without sacrificing the essential qualities that have been successful in earlier models. The Oyster 53 is a prime example. Since its introduction in

Perry 59

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 29, 2006
With a name like Free Range Chicken, the explanation for how this yacht got its name needs to be offered up front. “It’s my ninth boat,” says owner Bruce Anderson. “My first boat was a Catalina 27 that I sailed out of Chicago. Fast forward to boat number six, and I’m in Southern California with a custom Andrews 36. With that boat I thought maybe we would build a bunch of sisterships, so I wanted

Kanter 47

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
This yacht was built for Jim Stephen, an avid one-design sailor who wanted good speed under sail, plus plenty of legroom for his family when they are cruising. The result is this moderate-displacement centerboard sloop designed by naval architect Dieter Empacher and built in aluminum at Kanter Yachts in St. Thomas, Ontario. The raised deckhouse and large windows create a spacious and well-lit

Briand 78

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Whimsy, designed by naval architect Philippe Briand, was launched by Vaudrey Miller Yachts late last summer. The owner, an experienced racing yachtsman who formerly managed a major British design agency, was deeply involved in the project, whose guiding principle was “less is more.” The end result is a very contemporary cruising yacht, which has a modern hull shape,

Lagoon 420

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Even though the first Lagoon 420 is being launched only this month, this cat has attracted much attention and many purchase orders since it was first announced a little over a year ago. What makes this yacht so newsworthy is that it comes equipped with electric propulsion as standard equipment; diesel engines are available, of course, but only as an option. The standard setup consists of a

Najad 405

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
When naval architects Judel/Vrolijk and interior designer Dick Young teamed up with this well-known Swedish builder, the result was bound to be stimulating. This 40-foot center-cockpit yacht has improved sailing performance and interior styling that enhances the cruising experience.The cockpit is well configured, teak decks are standard, and a very nice cockpit table

Wally 148

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Commissioned by an experienced yachtsman who wanted a high-performance bluewater passagemaker, this 148-foot Wally was developed by Bill Tripp from the lines of a 143-foot Tripp design now being finished by Wally after a two-year build. The yacht displaces 309,000 pounds, and its lifting keel allows draft to vary from 19 feet, 9 inches to just over 13 feet. The standing rigging will be of PBO

Warwick 80

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Large catamarans are starting to look very attractive, and this latest addition to the line of Warwick–designed catamarans is no exception. This design focuses on accommodating charter groups or an owner’s invited guests. The forward-facing saloon has a secondary steering station. Farther aft is a circular dining table with overhead skylights. The expansive aft deck behind the main saloon is

Reichel/Pugh 62

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
A very experienced bluewater cruiser commissioned this fast carbon/epoxy cruising yacht and believes that even with all unnecessary weight removed, the yacht will be comfortable and seaworthy. Lyman Morse is using pre-preg carbon and SCRIMP resin infusion to build the vessel. The design features a full range of onboard systems, including a complete hydraulic package for operating the sailhandling

Southerly 46RS

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Northshore Yachts has led the way in developing swing-keel designs that sail well in all conditions. Their newest and largest model is this new 46-footer designed by Jason Ker in conjunction with the Northshore design team. The yacht’s key feature is a cast-iron grounding plate that ties into a web of frames and longitudinal stringers to create a strong and light structure that supports the keel.
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