Boats

Waterwitch 48

by Charles Mason, Posted September 28, 2006
As president of the New York Jets football team, Jay Cross puts in his share of long hours. When it’s time to decompress, chances are he’ll be found out on the water. That’s nothing new. As a young sailor, Cross competed in 470 dinghies at the Olympic level and also designed and raced International 14s; in the early ‘80s his Cross III design was a world standard for the class. But his subsequent

Perini 289

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Perini Navi and Yildiz Gemi, the company’s Turkish facility, launched this three-masted ship, the largest sailing yacht in the world, in March 2006. The 289-foot vessel was built in steel and was launched from a drydock moored in the bay of Tuzla.When fully rigged, the yacht will have three rotating masts and will set nearly 26,000 square feet of sail. The rig and sail controls are managed

Dubois 130

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Designed by Dubois Naval Architects, this 130-foot aluminum sloop was built for an experienced American owner, who was planning to buy a large motoryacht until he saw another Dubois design similar to this one in Auckland. Janice, like many Dubois designs, has a low profile and spacious accommodations for owner and crew, but this design, says Dubois, has an even lower superstructure than

Sunreef 122

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Sunreef Yachts has built many catamarans in the 60-foot range but is now moving into larger yachts, many of them custom projects. One example is this 122-foot aluminum yacht, which will sail with a crew of six. The crew is housed in the forward sections of the port hull, and a full-service galley for the entire ship’s company, along with the crew’s dining area, is located in the after section of

Tripp 76 Cafe Racer

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Baltic Yachts has started work on this lifting-keel sloop from the board of Tripp Design. Carbon construction and composite rigging will keep its weight down and allows for the installation of a luxurious Dick Young–designed interior.A caf racer is a cruising yacht whose sailing characteristics approach those of a racer, but whose modern aesthetics are a source of pride to an owner when

Mal 40

by Tom Dove, Posted September 21, 2006
The Mal 40 is the latest gem from a highly regarded Swedish builder of cruising boats from 36 to 46 feet. Like all Mals, this one can be customized extensively, an appealing feature for the sailor who has been around enough to have strong opinions.It’s not a racing boat, but it is exactly the sort of vessel you’d want for extended coastal cruising or ocean voyaging. Not that it’s

Hoyt H-10

by Bill Springer, Posted September 21, 2006
You’ll find Opti-mists and 420s on many yacht-club docks, but hasn’t the time come for a more modern small-boat design? Designer Garry Hoyt thinks so. His new H-10 is designed to be a stable, fast, and fun dinghy that will fill the gap between the Opti and bigger boats like the Laser and 420. To keep the boat light and easy for a kid to handle alone, the 10-foot-long hull is

Andrews 45

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 21, 2006
West Coaster Alan Andrews has drawn a long line of fast racing sleds, and with this 45-footer he shows that he can turn his mind to cruising too—fast cruising, that is. The Andrews 45 has pretty though reasonably conventional above-waterline looks, but a peek below the bootstripe reveals a stilettolike spade rudder and deep T-keel that obviously mean business. With just 12 feet, 7 inches of beam,

Morris M42

by Bill Springer, Posted September 21, 2006
With the launch of the 42-foot M42, it appears Morris Yachts is hoping to corner the market on the “big luxury daysailer” category. And if the success of the 36-foot M36 is any indication, Morris may be on to something. Like the 36, the 42 has easy sailhanding features, a self-tacking jib, and a painted carbon-fiber rig. It also has an elegantly simple, open accommodations

Lagoon 440

by Tom Dove, Posted September 21, 2006
Even a short look back in time shows how accustomed we have become to luxury in our boats. We expect beautiful wood joinery, smooth fiberglass work, large electrical systems, sophisticated nav gear, electric winches, effortless sail handling, spacious living areas, and galleys that rival our kitchens at home. The Lagoon 440 has all that, and as the TV ads say, “But
  • facebook
  • twitter