Boats

Island Packet 465

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
The Island Packet 465 is evidence that the company sees the benefits of the center-cockpit configuration, as do the owners of the boat I test-sailed off New London, Connecticut, last fall. Mark and Janet Gorrell invited me to join them on their boat’s maiden cruise to see how the first 465 to be launched here in the States (hull #1 went to Europe) performs.ConstructionThe

Elan 410

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Since even cruising sailors see the benefit of a little extra speed, the people at Elan have taken a logical step with their restyled Performance series. The Elan 410 is touted to be quick (especially in light wind) and comfortable. To do that, a tall rig allows for maximum sail area when the wind is light, but is easily reefed when the wind gets into the high 20s. As with

J/122

by David Schmidt, Posted August 8, 2008
The new J/122, a 40-foot cruiser/racer, was designed by Alan Johnstone of the legendary J/Boats family and is being built in France by J/Europe. Its sporty credentials include light-to-moderate displacement (14,900 pounds), minimal overhangs, and a slippery, flat-bottomed hull form. A swept-back double-spreader Hall Spars carbon-fiber rig and a retractable carbon-fiber bowsprit are standard; the

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 39 DS

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Jeanneau helped to revolutionize the deck-saloon aesthetic when it launched the curvy and distinctive 54 DS about five years ago. The orders rolled in, the company soon realized it was on to something, and 49- and 42-foot models followed. The most recent deck-saloon launch, the 39 DS, is probably about the minimum length for this popular layout and is designed to provide, in a smaller package,

Alerion Express 33

by Bill Springer, Posted August 8, 2008
Daysailers are back. They’re not the low-cost, first-step, “let’s learn to sail” boats of the 1970s, but instead are elegant, classic-looking upscale little yachts for experienced skippers who have steadily moved up to cruisers over the years and now seek something simpler. The Alerion Express 33 fills a gap in that company’s line of 20- to 38-foot daysailers.     On Deck•

Sabre Spirit

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Big daysailers that are attractive, quick, and easy to sail continue to gain in popularity for a simple reason—the design concept fits a growing number of owners (and prospective owners). The folks at Sabre understand this, and the 36-foot Sabre Spirit is a worthy entry into this ever-expanding field. Most of my test sail took place during a friendly race staged off Marblehead, Massachusetts. I

Anna

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Launched in June at the Brooklin Boat Yard, Brooklin, Maine, this 56-foot classic with a modern underbody borrows heavily from Stormy Weather, one of S&S’s most famous designs, which dates to the mid-1930s. With a few exceptions the yacht is a scaled-up version of Stormy, but, says S&S president and chief naval architect Greg Matzat, while most aesthetic elements from the older boat—sheer

Hood 55 Expedition

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Ted Hood has been designing seagoing yachts for over 50 years; his latest is an all-round ocean voyager. It’s designed with a tall rig for running before trade winds, and there’s also a big diesel to get to windward when time is short and the winds are from the wrong quarter. There’s comfortable seating behind either of the dual wheel stations, with good visibility in all directions. A remote

102-Foot Sloop

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Monty North has started work on this sloop for a client who built a 78-foot ketch at the yard many years ago. The yacht’s overall length is the smallest that can accommodate the fly bridge and superstructure the owner wanted and do so without disturbing the sailing performance and looks of the classic hull form. Designers worked for more than a year on the fly bridge concept. The

Oyster 525

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Yet another new Oyster is under way, and as usual the design emphasis is a balanced combination of performance, comfort, and solid construction.Designer Rob Humphreys has given the new yacht a larger cockpit than other designs in the size range. And like all Oysters, it is ergonomically designed for comfort. Belowdeck accommodations include a spacious saloon, three guest cabins, and an
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