Boats

Catalina 375

by Sail Staff, Posted December 8, 2008
All new designs from Catalina Yachts can trace their pedigrees back to the first boats Frank Butler built in California just as fiberglass-boat building was taking off. The newest, the Catalina 375, is one of them. In coming up with a successor to the legendary Catalina 36, Catalina’s long-time in-house designer, Gerry Douglas, had his work cut out for him. How do you improve on a design that has

Evolution, not Revolution

by Nigel Calder, Posted November 12, 2008
October’s Annapolis Boat Show opened as Wall Street experienced one of the biggest sell-offs in history. With the scary economic news, it was easy to think that many people would put off investing in a new boat. That idea went out the window as VIP Thursday appeared to be more crowded than ever. Instead of panicking, sailors seemed to be turning to sailing, much as they did after 9/11—as a

Beneteau 31

by Bill Springer, Posted November 3, 2008
I’m always impressed when a boat design shows you can teach an old dog new tricks. Thirty-one-foot coastal-cruising designs have been around since builders started using fiberglass to build hulls, so it’s easy to think that it’s all been done before. But the new Beneteau 31 has innovative solutions and incremental changes that have a positive effect on comfort, functionality, aesthetics, and

Dean 441

by Sail Staff, Posted August 26, 2008
Get close to the Dean 441 and open a bundle of surprises. From a distance, it could be just a typical mid-size catamaran with more mast rake than most, but once you’re aboard you’ll see a boat that’s totally different in both design and execution.The accommodations can be customized to suit the owner’s needs, and the hull, rig, and systems are built to thrive at sea. Since every

Something Bold, Something New

by Sail Staff, Posted August 21, 2008
Kaidoz 31Some of the most innovative boat designs and concepts come out of France, and here is a fine example. The Kaidoz 31 has the rig of a hotshot racer, a hull design that gets it planing at 16 knots or more, and an accommodation plan that’s unlike anything I’ve seen on a monohull sailboat.The twin rudders, torpedo-shaped ballast bulb slung from a skinny keel, huge rig,

Beneteau First 50

by Tom Dove, Posted August 11, 2008
There's a whole lot more here than headroom and easily handled sailsThe hull form is sleek and sophisticated, the eyebrows above the ports denote competence and self-worth, and some of the accessories belowdeck are fine leather. The Beneteau First 50 starts with style, but it carries through with performance. An owner looking for a fast cruiser, an occasional racer, and/or a

Najad 355

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
A fixed windshield and teak deck create a familiar Scandinavian look, but the Najad 355 appears sleeker than many offshore cruisers. "It attracts the younger crowd with a little higher performance, contemporary style and interior, and a racy look," said broker Rob Robinson. CONSTRUCTIONThe hull carries a flat underbody and a fine entry that flares gracefully into a moderately

X-34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
Many of today's boats are designed to be both quick and comfortable, and X Yachts continues to stake its claim in the performance-cruiser market. The X-34 is light, nimble, and sturdy, as I learned firsthand during several hours of thrashing into a stiff 17-to-20-knot headwind and steep chop on a recent 50-mile test sail/delivery.CONSTRUCTIONThe hull and deck are built

Jeanneau 42i

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
The Jeanneau 42i is not of the same family as the iPod, iPhone, or iMac, but it's just as much a piece of 21st-century technology. At Jeanneau, the "i" stands for "resin infusion." CONSTRUCTIONResin infusion is an engineering process that makes a strong laminate with optimum glass:resin ratios and few voids while reducing factory emissions. Jeanneau uses the method to

Ophira V

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
This 80-foot aluminum ketch is the third yacht to be built by Van Dam Nordia for the same owner. His first yacht was a 57-footer; his second was a 62-footer. With the earlier yachts he had the final word on all design details, but this one includes his family's contributions to the design effort. General features include a V-shaped hull forward that minimizes pounding in rough seas and a sailing
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