Boats

Flagships: Shipman 57

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 14, 2012
This carbon-fiber/epoxy performance cruiser is the result of yet another collaboration—this time between noted cruising boat designers J&J Design and performance specialists Doug Peterson and Guillaume Verdier.

Catalina 385

by Charles J. Doane, Posted June 13, 2012
The Catalina 385 is third in a series of new boats that began in 2009 with the award-winning 445 model. The concept behind this “5” series of boats is fairly simple: marry the best aspects of modern mass-production cruising boat design and construction with a healthy streak of common sense and practicality.
This latest offering in Beneteau’s revitalized Oceanis line of family cruising boats was introduced at the Miami International Boat Show in February. Like the new Oceanis 45, which received a 2012 European Boat of the Year Award, the 48 immediately won some accolades and was tapped for a National Marine Manufacturers Association Innovation Award soon after the show opened.

Oyster 625

by Tom Dove, Posted June 12, 2012
Sailing is about excitement, freedom and motion without machinery. What Americans would call “yachting” also includes security, comfort and luxury. Given this definition, the Oyster 625 truly provides the full yachting experience.
I had a feeling that the Marc Lombard-designed Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 379 would be fun to sail even before I took one out for a test drive in 20-25 knots of breeze. I’d sailed the first of the similarly re-designed Sun Odysseys—the 409—the previous year, and I expected the folks at Jeanneau would have little trouble serving up more of the same performance and comfort in a slightly smaller 37ft package.
Along with the burgeoning popularity of catamarans comes the realization that there are nowhere near as many entry-level cruising cats as there are monohulls. If I want to buy a new 30- to 33-foot monohull for some unambitious, uncomplicated coastal sailing, then all of the major production builders have at least one model that would suit me.

Flagships: Cheveyo

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 6, 2012
A collaboration between Sparkman & Stephens and England’s Spirit Yachts, this “Super J” is adapted from the plans for Ranger, which defended the America’s Cup in 1937.

Catana 47

by Tom Dove, Posted June 4, 2012
The Catana yard in the Catalan region of southern France has been building 47-foot cruising catamarans for more than a dozen years. The newly redesigned Catana 47 incorporates more carbon fiber than its predecessors and springs from an entirely new hull and deck mold, but retains the same distinctive profile, tall twin daggerboards, open helm stations and performance-oriented rig.

RS Venture

by Jeremy Evans, Posted June 4, 2012
The RS Venture—one of a growing line of dinghies and sportboats from UK-based RS Sailing—has a great deal of space, boasting a huge cockpit that can carry up to 1,400 pounds of crew.
The Cruiser 32, smallest in Bavaria’s new line of family cruising boats, is one of the more ambitious boats I’ve come across recently. Like its larger sisters, it boasts a very modern hull form with a fine entry that carries lots of beam aft.
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