Boatworks Most Commented

In hot water

by Peter Nielsen, Posted February 16, 2009
Checklist

Tools

  • Screwdrivers
  • Wrenches
  • Cordless drill
  • Tube cutter
  • Materials

  • Water heater
  • 5/8" heavy-duty water hose
  • NPT fittings
  • Fasteners, as needed
  • After upgrading the mostly original fresh-water plumbing system on our 1973 Norlin 34 project boat with new hoses,


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    Wireless Mousetrap

    by Gordon West, Posted January 20, 2009
    Tom Gilbert of Jensen Beach, Florida, asks:

    "I'm about to install Wi-Fi on my boat so I can use my laptop when I'm in the harbor. I think a 14-element YAGI, such as the RL/WAVRVMAR or the RL/14ele2.4wp, would be good units I can aim, set, and receive. However, other people tell me that an omnidirectional antenna is the answer. Which is the better


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    Can you hear me now?

    by Sail Staff, Posted January 12, 2009
    Having a VHF radio on a boat is always a good idea. It allows you to communicate with other boats, marinas, and rescue services if necessary. I have two on my boat, one a handheld and the other a fixed set. Fixed sets have a maximum radiated power output of 25 watts, while handhelds normally have a maximum output of 5 watts. The more power a transmitter has, the farther its signal can travel. The
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    Strike out

    by Nigel Calder, Posted January 12, 2009
    Bob Graveline of Bismarck, North Dakota, asks:

    "Last summer my 34-footer was hit by lightning when it was sitting unattended in my marina slip. The boat was plugged into shore power when it was hit, but it was not drawing power. Do you think that having a boat plugged into shore power increases, decreases, or has no effect on the chance of damage from a


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    Deck gear

    by Sail Staff, Posted December 23, 2008
    Upgrading the deck gear on your boat can seriously enhance your sailing pleasure. Once you’ve sailed a boat set up with low-friction blocks, good rope clutches and jammers, and genoa-sheet cars that are quick and easy to adjust, it’s hard to go back to the creaky, friction-riddled 30- or 40-year-old deck gear that so many older boats are still saddled with.

    We had always planned to replace


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