Boatworks Most Commented

Outboard rebuild

by Sail Staff, Posted February 16, 2009
Checklist

Tools

  • Basic tool kit
  • Wrenches and sockets (metric if you’re working on a European or Japanese engine)
  • Screwdrivers
  • Propane blowtorch
  • Rubber mallet
  • Hammer
  • Razor blade
  • Pliers
  • Vise-Grips
  • Vise
  • 400-grit wet/dry sandpaper
  • Brush for applying grease and lubricating

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    In hot water

    by Peter Nielsen, Posted February 16, 2009
    Checklist

    Tools

  • Screwdrivers
  • Wrenches
  • Cordless drill
  • Tube cutter
  • Materials

  • Water heater
  • 5/8" heavy-duty water hose
  • NPT fittings
  • Fasteners, as needed
  • After upgrading the mostly original fresh-water plumbing system on our 1973 Norlin 34 project boat with new hoses,


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    Wireless Mousetrap

    by Gordon West, Posted January 20, 2009
    Tom Gilbert of Jensen Beach, Florida, asks:

    "I'm about to install Wi-Fi on my boat so I can use my laptop when I'm in the harbor. I think a 14-element YAGI, such as the RL/WAVRVMAR or the RL/14ele2.4wp, would be good units I can aim, set, and receive. However, other people tell me that an omnidirectional antenna is the answer. Which is the better


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    Daisy chain

    by Don Casey, Posted January 20, 2009
    Howard Lennox of Lexington Park, Maryland, asks:

    "I'd like to know how to inspect (for corrosion) a chainplate that is encapsulated inside a bulkhead. Are there any nondestructive tests I can perform to determine a chainplate's condition without having to cut into the bulkhead?"

    Don Casey replies:

    When a through-the-deck chainplate begins to


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    Can you hear me now?

    by Sail Staff, Posted January 12, 2009
    Having a VHF radio on a boat is always a good idea. It allows you to communicate with other boats, marinas, and rescue services if necessary. I have two on my boat, one a handheld and the other a fixed set. Fixed sets have a maximum radiated power output of 25 watts, while handhelds normally have a maximum output of 5 watts. The more power a transmitter has, the farther its signal can travel. The
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