Boatworks

Repairing Wooden Rubrails and Toerails

by Paul Calder, Posted December 19, 2014

Thanks to the high cost of marine lumber and a growing aversion to brightwork maintenance, fewer new boats these days have wooden rubrails or toerails. This is understandable—wood is pricey to install and, if finished bright, is a lot of work to maintain.


FULL STORY

Every once in a while you hear about a boat stored ashore that leaked enough rainwater to fill the bilge and flood the cabin. What a mess! And even a little water in the bilge, if it freezes, can cause damage.


FULL STORY

Leaking portlights are a common sight on older sailboats, and they aren’t uncommon on newer ones. Often the owner does not notice small leaks, but over time they get worse and worse until they cannot be ignored.


FULL STORY

Anchor Test in the Chesapeake Bay

by Rudy and Jill Sechez, Posted November 19, 2014

 Last August we were invited by Fortress Anchors to observe a comparison of 11 anchors in Chesapeake Bay. The tests were conducted over a four-day period at the mouth of Back Creek in the Patuxent River, with the results analyzed by Robert Taylor, P.E, a noted consultant in this field.


FULL STORY

Installing shore power on a cruising boat is an easy and relatively inexpensive project, as long as you have basic DIY skills, can read a manual and are realistic about your needs. If you’re just planning to live aboard your boat in a marina and want to run appliances like a heater, a fan, a TV and a blender (hey—why not?), then you can get by with a simple installation that will set you back just a few hundred bucks if you do the work yourself. 

 

FULL STORY
  • facebook
  • twitter