Boats

Oyster 525

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Yet another new Oyster is under way, and as usual the design emphasis is a balanced combination of performance, comfort, and solid construction.

Designer Rob Humphreys has given the new yacht a larger cockpit than other designs in the size range. And like all Oysters, it is ergonomically designed for comfort.

Belowdeck accommodations include a spacious saloon, three guest cabins, and an


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Wauquiez Pilot Saloon 55

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
The largest design to date in the venerable Wauquiez line of seagoing craft is moving toward a launch date expected at the end of the year. A main feature of the design is the arch that supports the mainsheet, bimini, cockpit speakers, and lights. The yacht’s primary winches are electric and can be controlled from either of the dual steering stations. Both the main and genoa sheets are led aft
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Oyster 655

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008

The Oyster 655 is the latest model in Oyster’s new g5 series of Kevlar/carbon deck-saloon cruisers. The hull lines were created and drawn by naval architect Rob Humphreys and Oyster’s own experienced in-house design team, with engineering assistance from the composite engineering company High Modulus. As a result, the 655’s single-skin hull has an E-glass/carbon/Kevlar composite laminate that


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Baraka

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008
A happy combination, with everything right

If you want a yacht that can give you the ride of your life during the day and provide hotel-style accommodations at anchor, Jean de Fontenay’s Reichel Pugh designed 62-foot sloop, Baraka, takes the brass ring in both categories. Fontenay, a sailor with impressive credentials, thrives on the challenges that come with sailing a


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Spirit 56

by Malcolm White, Posted August 7, 2008

When you look at the classic mahogany brightwork, teak decks, and fine ends of a Spirit-built yacht, you are to be forgiven if you suspect it dates from the early twentieth century. Then you notice the rod rigging, the carbon-fiber spars, and the foil keel and lead bulb under a cedar-stripped hull—all part of the latest technology. This is how today’s builders blend the above-water


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