Boats

Catalina 375

by Sail Staff, Posted December 8, 2008
All new designs from Catalina Yachts can trace their pedigrees back to the first boats Frank Butler built in California just as fiberglass-boat building was taking off. The newest, the Catalina 375, is one of them. In coming up with a successor to the legendary Catalina 36, Catalina’s long-time in-house designer, Gerry Douglas, had his work cut out for him. How do you improve on a design that has
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Evolution, not Revolution

by Nigel Calder, Posted November 12, 2008
October’s Annapolis Boat Show opened as Wall Street experienced one of the biggest sell-offs in history. With the scary economic news, it was easy to think that many people would put off investing in a new boat. That idea went out the window as VIP Thursday appeared to be more crowded than ever. Instead of panicking, sailors seemed to be turning to sailing, much as they did after 9/11—as a
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Beneteau 31

by Bill Springer, Posted November 3, 2008
I’m always impressed when a boat design shows you can teach an old dog new tricks. Thirty-one-foot coastal-cruising designs have been around since builders started using fiberglass to build hulls, so it’s easy to think that it’s all been done before. But the new Beneteau 31 has innovative solutions and incremental changes that have a positive effect on comfort, functionality, aesthetics, and
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Dean 441

by Sail Staff, Posted August 26, 2008

Get close to the Dean 441 and open a bundle of surprises. From a distance, it could be just a typical mid-size catamaran with more mast rake than most, but once you’re aboard you’ll see a boat that’s totally different in both design and execution.

The accommodations can be customized to suit the owner’s needs, and the hull, rig, and systems are built to thrive at sea. Since every


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Something Bold, Something New

by Sail Staff, Posted August 21, 2008
Kaidoz 31Some of the most innovative boat designs and concepts come out of France, and here is a fine example. The Kaidoz 31 has the rig of a hotshot racer, a hull design that gets it planing at 16 knots or more, and an accommodation plan that’s unlike anything I’ve seen on a monohull sailboat.

The twin rudders, torpedo-shaped ballast bulb slung from a skinny keel, huge rig,


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