Boats

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 39 DS

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Jeanneau helped to revolutionize the deck-saloon aesthetic when it launched the curvy and distinctive 54 DS about five years ago. The orders rolled in, the company soon realized it was on to something, and 49- and 42-foot models followed. The most recent deck-saloon launch, the 39 DS, is probably about the minimum length for this popular layout and is designed to provide, in a smaller package,
FULL STORY

Alerion Express 33

by Bill Springer, Posted August 8, 2008

Daysailers are back. They’re not the low-cost, first-step, “let’s learn to sail” boats of the 1970s, but instead are elegant, classic-looking upscale little yachts for experienced skippers who have steadily moved up to cruisers over the years and now seek something simpler. The Alerion Express 33 fills a gap in that company’s line of 20- to 38-foot daysailers.

 

 

On Deck


FULL STORY

Sabre Spirit

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Big daysailers that are attractive, quick, and easy to sail continue to gain in popularity for a simple reason—the design concept fits a growing number of owners (and prospective owners). The folks at Sabre understand this, and the 36-foot Sabre Spirit is a worthy entry into this ever-expanding field. Most of my test sail took place during a friendly race staged off Marblehead, Massachusetts. I
FULL STORY

Anna

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008

Launched in June at the Brooklin Boat Yard, Brooklin, Maine, this 56-foot classic with a modern underbody borrows heavily from Stormy Weather, one of S&S’s most famous designs, which dates to the mid-1930s. With a few exceptions the yacht is a scaled-up version of Stormy, but, says S&S president and chief naval architect Greg Matzat, while most aesthetic elements from the older boat—sheer


FULL STORY

Hood 55 Expedition

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Ted Hood has been designing seagoing yachts for over 50 years; his latest is an all-round ocean voyager. It’s designed with a tall rig for running before trade winds, and there’s also a big diesel to get to windward when time is short and the winds are from the wrong quarter. There’s comfortable seating behind either of the dual wheel stations, with good visibility in all directions. A remote
FULL STORY
  • facebook
  • twitter