Boats

Seaquest 36

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The British are coming! The British are coming! Actually, it's the British-built, Reichel/Pugh—designed Seaquest 36. After a successful launch and wins notched in races all over Europe, the Seaquest 36—replete with narrow-chord bulb keel, high-octane sailplan, weight-saving interior, and impressive polar numbers—has arrived. It's a flat-out racing design concerned more with
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X-40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The new X-40 is a chip off the old block. Flush with the success of the X-43 and X-46, X-Yachts designer Niels Jeppesen has drawn this new 40-footer to be as sexy, sturdy, comfortable, and responsive as its larger siblings. And it seems to have all the necessary ingredients. The cored hull is light and stiff, the sailplan has power to burn, and the hand-polished teak joinery is sure to turn some
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Hunter 33

by Sail Staff, Posted August 24, 2004
It appears that designer Glenn Henderson is systematically redesigning the entire Hunter line. He's already drawn 21-, 35-, 41-, and 44-footers and now he's turned his computer mouse and designer's eye on the 33-footer. As with Henderson's previous designs, the new Hunter 33 carries its beam well aft to provide for considerable interior volume. The boat has a large aft master
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Etap 37s

by Tom Dove, Posted August 23, 2004
After sailing two or three hundred boats, I thought there would be no utterly novel features for me to discover aboard the next one. I was mistaken. Boat designers are a creative lot, and when they're engineers as well, the result can be a vessel loaded with innovative features. The Belgian-built Etap 37 is just such a package of pleasant surprises. Or maybe I shouldn't be surprised; after all, a
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Gunboat 34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 23, 2004
Flush with the success of the aggressive Gunboat 62, Peter Johnstone and multihull designers Morelli & Melvin have brought the same go-fast and go-comfortable approach to the new Gunboat 34. It's designed to be easy to singlehand and to easily log double-digit speeds under sail. All lines lead to the helm station, which is located in the center of the open bridgedeck under a hardtop. Living
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