Boats

Harryproa Visionarry

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005

Proas were all the rage back in the 60s when tacking your entire rig (shunting) was a small price to pay for the speed potential of a multihull that had the reduced wetted surface of one main hull and one stabilizing hull. As catamarans and trimarans continued to set speed records and become increasingly popular and easy to sail, it looked like the proa had gone the way of


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Dufour 455

by James Jermain, Posted September 23, 2005

Forty years ago Michel Dufour dragged boatbuilding into the industrial age by being one of the first to design boats specifically for production building methods. The company came out of some recent financial troubles and launched a “new era” in 2003. Since then two parallel but carefully matched lines of cruising boats have been introduced.

One is a group of performance


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Corsair Sprint 750

by Bill Springer, Posted September 23, 2005
The new Corsair Sprint 750 represents a high-octane evolution of the successful Corsair 24. Its length and overall profile are similar to the 24’s, but over 100 pounds have been trimmed from the hull and the cockpit has been lengthened at the expense of some interior volume in the cuddy cabin. The cabin has a small double bunk and a place to put an optional porta-potty, but accommodations space
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Broadblue 42

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2005

The Broadblue 42 is the latest cruising cat designed specifically for owners with offshore-cruising aspirations, and it appears to have all the right comfort and safety features. It has the large saloon, the bright, airy interior, the well-designed galley, and the four private cabins you’d expect on a cat that’s 42 feet long and over 20 feet wide, as well as watertight


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Leopard 40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2005

South African catamaran specialist Robertson and Caine has been known for building production boats that were distinctively South African, with bridgedeck clearances slightly lower than those seen on French or Canadian cruising cats and hull shapes a bit wider in the stern to provide more buoyancy aft. The thinking was that a lower bridgedeck reduces the boat’s center of


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