Boats

Kernan 69

by Kimball Livingston, Posted October 5, 2006
On the West Coast the heyday of the 70-foot sleds is remembered fondly, with good reason. Thanks to their light weight, those old sleds were not hard to manage, they were medium-tech so cost per foot wasn’t sky high, and you could race one with nothing more than a bunch of good sailors; forget the posse of full-time gunslingers. But the sled craze peaked in the early 1990s and later the West
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Morris 42

by Tom Dove, Posted October 5, 2006
Tom and Cuyler Morris appear to have two runaway bestsellers in their M 36 and 42 daysailer/weekender designs. So why are they building another cruising boat that has much of the styling that got them started in the boat-building business years ago? “It just seemed like the right thing to do,” says Tom Morris. Morris observes that while Europeans are surrounded by historic structures, they like
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Dixon 130

by Sail Staff, Posted October 5, 2006
This Bill Dixon–designed 130-foot ketch was launched after a three-year build at the Royal Huisman yard. Conceived as a contemporary cruiser for the owner and his family and friends, its interior, featuring French walnut, was created by Dick Young Design. During sailing trials Antares was able to reach 14 knots in moderate conditions.


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Standfast 43

by Sail Staff, Posted October 5, 2006
Frans Maas has been designing and building boats for many years. He created this masthead sloop as a one-off, but he hopes it will serve as a prototype for a limited series of semi-custom yachts. The design is in the Maas tradition—an attractive, low-maintenance, and easily operated performance cruiser.

Construction is carbon fiber set in vacuum-infused epoxy resin over a foam core.


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Hoek 180

by Sail Staff, Posted October 5, 2006
This 180-foot aluminum ketch by Andre Hoek set sail last May after being launched from the Vitters shipyard in The Netherlands. The yacht, which took five years to design and build, has long overhangs, relatively low freeboard, and a narrow beam (only 31 feet) for its length. After sea trials, and commissioning Adele left for an extended summer cruise to the Lofoten Islands, which lie well beyond
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