Boats Most Commented

Alden 55

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
Designer Bill Cook has teamed up with Alden Yachts to create this semi-custom center-cockpit yacht with a 44-foot, 5-inch waterline and a 15-foot, 8-inch beam. Construction will be in epoxy with a balsa core. With tooling completed and hull number 1 well under way Cook also has drawn up plans for aft-cockpit and pilothouse versions; the latter will come with a well-appointed inside steering
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Sakonnet 23

by Sail Staff, Posted November 9, 2005
With the Sakonnet 23, designer Joel White sought to design a simple daysailer that offers “good speed, comfortable seating for four, and good looks,” because “a properly designed daysailer gives the maximum in boating pleasure for the dollars spent.” I think it’s safe to say that this double-ended daysailer built by Edey & Duff accomplishes White’s simple goal. Its lines are
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Southerly 110

by Sail Staff, Posted November 9, 2005
Boats from Southerly Yachts may look like many other offshore cruising boats, but they have a trick up the trunk—the ability to combine the stability of moderate displacement and a heavy fixed keel with the versatility of a variable-draft swing keel. As anyone can attest who has dug a fixed keel into a shoal, or been on a boat that was too deep to get into a shallow gunkhole,
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PDQ Antares 44i

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
Voluminous cruising catamarans have a reputation for being ideal charterboats, but the boat builders at PDQ Yachts are quick to point out that the new Antares 44i cruising cat is not intended to be a charterboat. Rather, they say, it’s a sturdy, well-equipped bluewater cruiser built specifically for private owners. They also report that the accommodations plan is well suited to long-term
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Harryproa Visionarry

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005

Proas were all the rage back in the 60s when tacking your entire rig (shunting) was a small price to pay for the speed potential of a multihull that had the reduced wetted surface of one main hull and one stabilizing hull. As catamarans and trimarans continued to set speed records and become increasingly popular and easy to sail, it looked like the proa had gone the way of


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