Boats Most Commented

Southerly 110

by Sail Staff, Posted November 9, 2005
Boats from Southerly Yachts may look like many other offshore cruising boats, but they have a trick up the trunk—the ability to combine the stability of moderate displacement and a heavy fixed keel with the versatility of a variable-draft swing keel. As anyone can attest who has dug a fixed keel into a shoal, or been on a boat that was too deep to get into a shallow gunkhole,
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PDQ Antares 44i

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
Voluminous cruising catamarans have a reputation for being ideal charterboats, but the boat builders at PDQ Yachts are quick to point out that the new Antares 44i cruising cat is not intended to be a charterboat. Rather, they say, it’s a sturdy, well-equipped bluewater cruiser built specifically for private owners. They also report that the accommodations plan is well suited to long-term
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Harryproa Visionarry

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005

Proas were all the rage back in the 60s when tacking your entire rig (shunting) was a small price to pay for the speed potential of a multihull that had the reduced wetted surface of one main hull and one stabilizing hull. As catamarans and trimarans continued to set speed records and become increasingly popular and easy to sail, it looked like the proa had gone the way of


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Broadblue 42

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2005

The Broadblue 42 is the latest cruising cat designed specifically for owners with offshore-cruising aspirations, and it appears to have all the right comfort and safety features. It has the large saloon, the bright, airy interior, the well-designed galley, and the four private cabins you’d expect on a cat that’s 42 feet long and over 20 feet wide, as well as watertight


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Leopard 40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2005

South African catamaran specialist Robertson and Caine has been known for building production boats that were distinctively South African, with bridgedeck clearances slightly lower than those seen on French or Canadian cruising cats and hull shapes a bit wider in the stern to provide more buoyancy aft. The thinking was that a lower bridgedeck reduces the boat’s center of


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