Boats Most Commented

Modern Tradition

by Peter Nielsen, Posted May 31, 2011
If there’s one lesson to be taken away from the success of the daysailer concept, it is that traditional is never old-fashioned—at least not when it comes to boats. I find plenty of modern boats attractive, but the only drop-dead, wolf-whistle gorgeous ones are those that look as though they could have been built at any time in the last century.

I’m far from alone in this.


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The Dynamic Duo

by Peter Nielsen, Posted April 21, 2011
Eavesdropping on an in-depth discussion of rating rules will send a casual bystander into a deep sleep as effectively as any hypnotist, and IRC—the successor to IOR and IMS—is no exception to this, er, rule. All I can say with any kind of authority is that boats designed to IRC tend to be a good deal more interesting than the rule itself. Over the last few years we’ve seen a steady stream of IRC
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Remaking History

by Kimball Livingston, Posted March 11, 2011
It’s a good bet that Starling Burgess, when drawing the lines for his 1934 America’s Cup defender Rainbow, never imagined that a new Rainbow would be almost ready to launch 77 years later. Or that a new version of his 1937 defender, Ranger, would be already sailing. But the J Class represents the epitome of beauty and elegance under sail, and because of that, the Js are back. Six
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The Class 40 began in 2004 as a scaled-down, less-expensive version of the Open 60 and Open 50 monohulls that are the darlings of professional shorthanded offshore racing in Europe. The idea was to give amateurs an affordable class that was a step up from the Mini Transat 6.5, but pros have since embraced the boat as well.

In the 2006 Route du Rhum race from France to Guadeloupe, 25 Class


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Alibi 54

by Sail Staff, Posted March 11, 2011
High-performance cruising catamarans are few and far between, perhaps because most cat buyers want to go cruising long-term and thus buy boats built for comfort rather than speed. High performance also means light weight, which in turn means a price premium, so boats like the Alibi 54 are aimed at a small but discerning and well-heeled audience. From its dreadnaught bows to its stepped transoms,
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